Kings Norton

Photo of St. Nicolas' Church, Kings Norton, and the Saracen's Head, both part of Saint Nicolas Place, Kings Norton by Oosoom, some rights reserved.

King’s Norton Worcestershire Family History

Kings Norton is an Ecclesiastical Parish in the county of Worcestershire, created in 1846 from a chapelry in Bromsgrove Parish.

Other places in the parish include: Balsall Heath, Headley, Kings Heath, Tanners Green, Longbridge, Moundsley, Rednal, and Lickey.

Nonconformists in Kings Norton include: Baptist, Countess of Huntingdon Methodist, Methodist New Connexion, Primitive Methodist, Roman Catholic, Unitarian, and Wesleyan Methodist.

Parishes adjacent to Kings Norton

  • Bromsgrove
  • Frankley
  • Wythall
  • Shirley
  • Yardley
  • Alvechurch
  • Yardley Wood
  • Cofton Hackett
  • Northfield
  • Solihull
  • Moseley

Historical Descriptions

Kings Norton

St. Nicolas' Church, Kings Norton by Oosoom. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

BEETON’S BRITISH GAZETTEER 1870

KING’S NORTON, a village and parish of England, in Worcestershire, 5 miles S.W. from its post town, Birmingham, in which the Birmingham and Worcestershire Canal passes through a tunnel nearly 2 miles long. The town possesses an old but very handsome parish church, with a fine tower and spire, and a grammar-school founded by Edward VI. It has a money ord. off. Pop. of par. 13,634. It is a station on the Derby, Birmingham, and Bristol line of the Midland Railway.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

THE IMPERIAL GAZETTEER OF ENGLAND & WALES 1870

Kings Norton.– town and par. with ry. sta., Worcestershire, in NE. of co., 5½ miles S. of Birmingham, 12,132 ac., pop. 34,071; P.O., T.O.; the Birmingham and Worcester Canal here passes through a tunnel 16 ft. wide, 18 ft. high, and nearly 2 miles long; there are extensive paper mills, rolling mills, a large screw factory, and well-known chocolate works.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND 1833

King’s Norton, co. Worcester.

P. T. Birmingham (109)) 5 m. SSW. Pop. 3651. Fairs, May 7, and Aug. 16, for all sorts of cattle.

A parish in the upper division of the hundred of Halfshire; it formerly had a market, which is now discontinued; living, a curacy subordinate to the vicarage of Bromsgrove, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Worcester, not in charge. The church, which is dedicated to St. Nicholas, is a fine building, with a very lofty and elegant spire, and contains many handsome monuments; patronage with Bromsgrove vicarage. Here is a freeschool, founded by Edward VI. The Worcester and Birmingham Canal passes through a hill in this vicinity, with a tunnel sixteen feet wide, and eighteen high, and so perfectly straight as to be seen through for a length of nearly two miles.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. II; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

WORCESTERSHIRE DELINEATED C. AND J. GREENWOOD 1822

King’s-Norton – a parochial chapelry, formerly in the parish of Bromsgrove, but made parochial by an act of Parliament obtained some time since. It is situated in the hundred of Halfshire, upper division, 9 miles N.E. from Bromsgrove, 5 miles from Birmingham, and 116 from London; containing 684 inhabited houses. The Worcester and Birmingham canal passes through this parish, which is about 34 miles in circuit. It was formerly a market town, and has now two fairs, 25th April and 5th Sept. A considerable number of tiles are made here, for which the clay is particularly well adapted. Edward the Sixth founded a free grammar school in King’s-Norton, and another at Birmingham, giving each their choice of land or money: King’s-Norton chose the latter, in consequence of which, their funds are now very limited, whilst the trustees of the school at Birmingham, having preferred land, are now in receipt of some thousands per annum. The church is a noble edifice, with a square tower, and an elegant frosted spire, which forms a conspicuous object for many miles round. The Rev. J. Wingfield, D.D. as vicar of Bromsgrove, is likewise vicar of King’s Norton, and appoints curates to the chapels of Moseley and Withal, both of which are perpetual cures. Population, 1801, 2807, 1811, 3068 – 1821, 3651.

Source: Worcestershire Delineated: Being a Topographical Description of Each Parish, Chapelry, Hamlet, &c. In the County; with the distances and bearings from their respective market towns, &c. By C. and J. Greenwood. Printed by T. Bensley, Crane Court, Fleet Street, London, 1822.

LAIRD DESCRIPTION OF WORCESTERSHIRE 1814

King’s Norton is a small village and Chapelry in Bromsgrove parish, and has a market on Saturdays, and two fairs for all sorts of cattle, on the 25th of April, and 5th of September. The chapel is not much inferior to the mother church at Bromsgrove, having a very lofty and elegantly ornamented spire, and much painted glass in the windows. There are several monuments; and it affords a most curious vocal pedigree, the late parish clerk’s ancestors having held that office upwards of 200 years. Here is a free-school founded by Edward VI. The Worcester and Birmingham canal passes through a hill in this vicinity, with a tunnel well worth examination. It is sixteen feet wide, and eighteen high, and, though for the sake of expedition, it was begun at both ends, yet its line is so perfectly straight as to be seen through, for a length of nearly two miles.

Source: A Topographical and Historical Description of the County of Worcester, by Mr. Laird. Printed for Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, Paternoster Row; and George Cowie and Co. successors to Vernor, Hood, and Sharp, 31, Poultry, London. Printed circa 1814.

Balsall Heath

Balsall Heath, circa 1890. Image by Aynuk_N._Ayli. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

IMPERIAL GAZETTEER OF ENGLAND & WALES 1870

Balsall Heath, a chapelry in King’s Norton parish, Worcester; on the Birmingham and Gloucester railway, 2 12 miles S of Birmingham. It was constituted in 1853; and it has a post office under Birmingham. Pop., 7,651. Houses, 1,616. The living is a p. curacy in the diocese of Worcester. Value, £300. Patron, the Incumbent of King’s Norton. The church is new. Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A Fullerton & Co. N.d.c. [1870-72].

Lickey

Lickey Hill Worcestershire Delineated C. and J. Greenwood 1822

Lickey-Hill, near Bromsgrove. This is supposed to be the highest ground in the kingdom, as there are several springs rise here which run to different points of the compass. An enclosure upon an extensive scale has lately been made on this barren waste, and good crops of turnips, clover, and potatoes, are now produced; other parts afford some delicate pasturage for sheep, and young plantations have been judiciously arranged. A few years since a water-spout broke over this hill, which completely laid the town of Bromsgrove under water, and occasioned considerable loss to the inhabitants.

Source: Worcestershire Delineated: Being a Topographical Description of Each Parish, Chapelry, Hamlet, &c. In the County; with the distances and bearings from their respective market towns, &c. By C. and J. Greenwood. Printed by T. Bensley, Crane Court, Fleet Street, London, 1822.

Description of Worcestershire Laird 1814

The Lickey is a wild and lofty range of hills, a little to the north of Bromsgrove; much of it, however is now in cultivation since the act of enclosure, and other parts judiciously covered with young plantations. The views from it, particularly into Warwickshire, and over Worcestershire, are very extensive and pleasing, and the winding road, as the tourist descends towards Northfield, is extremely romantic, between the high and impending cliffs, which, though not swelled into mountains, are yet sufficiently striking to produce a fine effect.

It has been very justly supposed that this is the highest ground in England, for it contains a small spring which divides itself into two streams; one of which, flowing to the northward, runs into the Rea, and after joining the Trent, falls into the German Ocean; whilst the other, emptying itself into the Stour, and thence to the Severn, is carried to the Irish sea. This great waste, as it was once, of 2000 acres, yielding nothing but heath, furze, and fern, and some delicate pasturage for sheep, is now enclosed in a great measure, and produces good crops of turnips, clover, and potatoes. This enclosure, for all expenses, cost about eight pounds per acre. Here too, the rights of the poor were carefully respected: the cottagers had their land allotted, and were confirmed in possession: and here, as well as at Bournheath in the same parish, many of this useful class of people live comfortably on their own premises, with well cultivated gardens, potatoe grounds, and pigs, but no cows. These Cottages are neat and comfortable; most of them built with brick and tile, and in general they are scattered about so as to produce a very picturesque effect.

Here the botanist will meet with the Cranberry, Vaccinum Oxycoccis, particularly in the bottoms, where boggy. It flowers here in June, and has its berries in September. In the same habitats too he will find the purple marsh cinque foil, Comarum Palustris.

Source: A Topographical and Historical Description of the County of Worcester, by Mr. Laird. Printed for Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, Paternoster Row; and George Cowie and Co. successors to Vernor, Hood, and Sharp, 31, Poultry, London. Printed circa 1814.

Moseley

A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland 1833

Moseley, co. Worcester.

P. T. Birmingham (109) 1¼ m. S. Pop. with Pa.

A chapelry in the parish of Bromsgrove and upper division of the hundred of Halfshire; living, a curacy subordinate to the vicarage of Bromsgrove, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Worcester, not in charge; ann. val. P. R. 75l. 3s. 10d.; chapel ded. to St. Mary, recently enlarged; patron, the Vicar of Bromsgrove.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. II; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

Worcestershire Delineated C. and J. Greenwood 1822

Moseley – a hamlet and chapelry to King’s-Norton, in the hundred of Pershore, 2 miles from Birmingham. Population returned with King’s-Norton.

Moseley-Hall – the residence of Mrs. Taylor, 2 miles from Birmingham, on the Alcester road.

Source: Worcestershire Delineated: Being a Topographical Description of Each Parish, Chapelry, Hamlet, &c. In the County; with the distances and bearings from their respective market towns, &c. By C. and J. Greenwood. Printed by T. Bensley, Crane Court, Fleet Street, London, 1822.

Directories

King’s Norton (with Balsall Heath, King’s Heath, Moseley and Wythall) 1855
Moseley Billings Directory of Worcestershire 1855
Balsall Heath 1855 Directory Listing
Kings Heath Billing’s Directory of Worcestershire 1855

London Gazette

William James Dunn - Balsall heath Worcestershire & Harborne Staffordshire - London Gazette 1850

Pursuant to the Acts for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors in England.

The following PRISONERS, whose Estates and Effects have been vested in the Provisional Assignee by Order of the Court for Relief of Insolvent Debtors, and whose Petitions and Schedules, duly filed, have been severally referred and transmitted to the County Courts hereinafter mentioned, pursuant to the Statute in that behalf, are ordered to be brought up before the Judges of the said Courts respectively, as herein set forth, to be dealt with according to Law :

Before the Judge of the County Court of Warwickshire, holden at Coventry, on Tuesday the 7th day of May 1850.

William James Dunn, of Peter’s-place, John-street, Balsall heath, near Birmingham, in the county of Worcester, previously of Smethwick, in the parish of Harborne, in the county of Stafford, part of the time carrying on business in Bennett’s-hill, in Birmingham, in the county of Warwick, and part of the time of No. 14, Colmore-row, in Birmingham aforesaid, in copartnership with William Sims Sutton, under the style or firm of Sutton and Dunn, formerly of No. 65, Coleman-street, London, and being all the time an Attorney-at-Law and Solicitor.

Administration

  • County: Worcestershire
  • Civil Registration District: Kings Norton
  • Probate Court: Court of the Bishop of Worcester (Episcopal Consistory)
  • Diocese: Worcester
  • Rural Deanery: Droitwich
  • Poor Law Union: Kings Norton
  • Hundred: Halfshire
  • Province: Canterbury