Oswestry

Oswestry, Shropshire Family History

Oswestry is an Ancient Parish and a market town in the county of Shropshire.

Other places in the parish include: Mesbury, Maesbury, Morton, Oswestry Rural, Oswestry Town, Pentregaer, Sweeney, Treferclawdd, TrefardclawddTreflach, Trefor-clawdd, Weston Cotton, Wooton, Wootton, Aston, Aston Caenynion, Crickheath, Cynynion, Hisland, Llanforda, and Middleton.

Parish church: 1558

Parish registers begin:

Nonconformists include: Baptist, Christians, Independent Methodist, Independent/Congregational, Particular Baptist, Primitive Methodist, Welsh Calvinistic Methodist, Welsh Independent, Welsh Wesleyan Methodist, and Wesleyan Methodist.

Parishes adjacent to Oswestry

  • Trefonen
  • Llansilin
  • Selattyn
  • Whittington
  • Kinnerley
  • Llanyblodwel
  • Rhydycroseau
  • Oswestry Holy Trinity
  • West Felton
  • Llanymynech
  • Carreghofa

Historical Descriptions

Oswestry

England and Wales Delineated Thomas Dugdale 1835

  • Name of Place: Oswestry;
  • County: Salop;
  • Number of Miles from: Ellesmere – 9. Chirk – 5, Shrewsbury – 17;
  • Dist. Lond. – 171;
  • Population – 8581.

Oswestry is situated upon the main road from London to Holyhead. The town stands upon higher ground than any in Shropshire, and the country around is delightfully varied with hills, vales, wood and water, and exhibits some very rich and picturesque scenery. Oswestry is a town of great antiquity, and its present appellation, was derived from the name of St. Oswald, King of Northumberland, who was defeated and slain here, by Penda, King of Mercia. Subsequently, when the great Offa constructed the barrier, still known by his name, Oswestry stood between it and Watt’s-dyke, which ran parallel to the former at the distance of two miles. It was thus rendered a border town, and hence was frequently the scene of contest, first between the Saxons and the Britons, and afterwards between the latter and the Normans. In 1212, King John burnt both the town and castle, which were then in the possession of the Fitzalans, and plundered a part of Wales on account of the refusal of Llewellin to join his standard, in opposition to Louis, the dauphin of France, who had been invited to England by the rebellious barons. Oswestry was likewise destroyed by the Welsh prince, called Llewellin the Great, 1233. During this period it was encircled by a strong wall, which had four gates, fronting the four cardinal points. Some traces of the wall still remain, but the gates were entirely demolished about the year 1769. Of the castle, which stood on a high artificial mound, at the west side of the town, only a few fragments now exist; these, however, are sufficient to indicate its former prodigious strength and consequent importance as a place of defence. The town is governed by a mayor, six aldermen, and eighteen councillors. The petty sessions for the hundred are held here, besides the courts connected with the borough. The church is a very ancient and spacious building, with a plain, well-proportioned tower at one end. Oswestry has been much improved within the last few years, in consequence of an act obtained in 1810, for widening, paving, and lighting the streets, and by the spirit of building which has resulted from that measure. The principal trade of the town is malting, which is very extensive; there is also a respectable hat manufactory; and there are an abundance of coals in the vicinity of the town. Upon the little river Mordu is a manufactory of flannel. The neighbourhood is to be remarked for its great respectability; and to the number of genteel and opulent families that it contains may, in a great measure, be attributed the prosperity of the town of Oswestry.

Market, Wednesday. – Fairs, March 16, for horned cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, home-made linen doth, &c.; great fair, May 12, ditto and pedlary, particularly oxen; Wednesday before June 24, ditto; August 15, ditto; Wednesday before Michaelmas-day, ditto; and December 10, ditto and firkin-butter. – Principal Inns, Commercial Hotel, Cross Keys, and Wynnstay Arms.

Source: England and Wales Delineated by Thomas Dugdale assisted by William Burnett; published by Tallis & Co., Green Arbour Court, Old Bailey, 1835.

Oswestry Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Oswestry. A market town and parish in the Oswestry division of the hundred of Oswestry, a vicarage discharged, in the diocese of St. Asaph, and the deanery of Marchia. Oswestry parish, not including the town, contains 692 houses, 3,613 inhabitants. The town, 844 houses, 3,910 inhabitants. The entire parish contains 1,536 houses, 7,523 inhabitants. 17 ½ miles north-west of Shrewsbury, 179 miles north-west of London. Market on Wednesday, Fairs 3rd Wednesday in January. March 15, May 12, Wednesday before Midsummer-day, August 15, Friday before September 29, December 10. LAT. 52.53½ N. LONG. 3.9. W.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Aston

Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Aston, 2½ m. S.E. and included in Oswestry

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Aston. A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the upper division of the hundred of Oswestry, chapel to Oswestry, 2 miles south-east of Oswestry. Aston Hall is the seat of William Lloyd, esq.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Crick Heath

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Crick Heath. A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the upper division of the hundred of Oswestry. 4 miles south of Oswestry.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Cynynion

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Cynynion. A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the upper division of the hundred of Oswestry.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Llanvorda or Llanforda

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Llanvorda or Llanforda. A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the upper division of the hundred of Oswestry. 1 ½ mile south-west of Oswestry.

The seat of Henry Watkin Williams Wynn, Esq. John Davies, Esq., recorder, 1635, in his MSS. “Observations of Oswestry,” says, “Rynerus, bishop of St. Asaph, suppressed the old church of the Mercians, called Llanvorda.”

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Maesbury

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Maesbury. A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the upper division of the hundred of Oswestry. 3 miles south-east of Oswestry.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Maesbrook or Meesbrook

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the upper division of the hundred of Oswestry.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Middleton

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Middleton. A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the upper division of the hundred of Oswestry. 2 miles south-east of Oswestry.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Moreton

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Moreton. A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the hundred of Oswestry. A curacy, in the diocese of St. Asaph, and the deanery of Marchia. 3 ½ miles south of Oswestry.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Pentregaer

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Pentregaer. A township in the parish of Oswestry, and in the upper division of the hundred of Oswestry.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Parish Registers

Oswestry Parish Registers 1558-1750

Shropshire Parish registers Diocese of St. Asaph Vol. IV (1909) and Vol. V (1912).

Author: Shropshire Parish Register Society

General editor; W. G. D. Fletcher

Publisher: Privately printed for the Shropshire Parish Register Society

Volume I, 1558 to 1669 - Archive.org Volume II, 1669 to 1727 - Archive.org Volume III, 1727 to 1812 - Archive.org Volume IV, 1750 to 1812 - Archive.org

The Register of Oswestry Old Chapel 1780 to 1812

Shropshire parish registers : Nonconformist and Roman Catholic registers (1903)

Author: Shropshire Parish Register Society; Evans, George Eyre; Fletcher, W. G. D. (William George Dimock), 1851-1935; Kinsella, William

Publisher: [London] : Privately printed for the Shropshire Parish Register Society

The Register of Oswestry Old Chapel 1780 to 1812 - Archive.org

Directories

Cynynion Cassey Shropshire Directory 1871

Administration

  • County: Shropshire
  • Civil Registration District: Oswestry
  • Probate Court: Court of the Bishop of St Asaph (Episcopal Consistory)
  • Diocese: St Asaph
  • Rural Deanery: Oswestry
  • Poor Law Union: Oswestry
  • Hundred: Oswestry
  • Province: Canterbury