Condover

Condover, Shropshire

Historical Descriptions

Condover Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Condover. A parish in the Condover division of the hundred of Condover, a vicarage discharged, in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield, the deanery of Salop, and archdeaconry of Salop. 274 houses, 1,378 inhabitants. 4 ½ miles south of Shrewsbury.

Condover is the birth place of Thomas Owen, a learned judge, who was educated at Oxford; from whence he removed to Lincoln’s Inn, where he became Lent reader to the society, in 1583. In 1590, he was made Serjeant at Law, and afterwards, a judge of the Common Pleas. He died in 1598. His reports were printed in 1656.

Richard Tarlton, or Tarleton, the earliest English comedian of celebrity, was also born at Condover. At what precise period he commenced actor is unknown. He was brought to London, and introduced to court, by a Servant of Robert, Earl of Leicester, who found him in a field, keeping his father’s swine. The Earl ‘highly pleased’ says Fuller, ‘with his happy unhappy answers,’ took him under his patronage.

In 1583, Queen Elizabeth, at the suit of Sir Francis Walsingham, constituted twelve players, who were sworn her servants, allowing them wages and liveries, as grooms of the chamber, (a custom which lasted till Colley Cibber’s time,) one of whom, was Tarleton.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824.

Condover Hamlets Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Condover Hamlets. A township in the parish of Condover, and in the Condover division of the hundred of Condover.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824