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Clun, Shropshire Family History

Clun is an Ancient Parish in the county of Shropshire.

Other places in the parish include: Bicton, Whitcott Keysett and Newcastle, Burfield, Chapel Lawn, Eddicliff, Ediclift, Ediclift with Whitcott Keyset and Shadwell, Guilden Down, Hobarris, Hobthorin, Hodre, Hopebarras, Hopebendrid, Hopebendrid with Menutton, Perlogue and Obarris, Kevencalonog, Manutton, Menupton, Menutton, Obarras, Obarris, Perlogne, Perlogue, Shadwell, Spoad, Treverward, Treverward with Menutton, Perlogue and Obarris, Upper Treverward, Weston, Whitcott Evan, Whitcott Keyset, Whitcott Keysett, and Bicton with Whitcott Keyset and Shadwell.

Parish church:

Parish registers begin: 1653

Nonconformists include: Baptist, Primitive Methodist, and Wesleyan Methodist.

Parishes adjacent to Clun

  • Stowe
  • Clunbury with Clunton
  • Newcastle
  • Lydbury North
  • Mainstone
  • Hopton Castle
  • Llanfair Waterdine
  • Bucknell and Buckton
  • Bishop's Castle

Historical Descriptions

Clun Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Clun, a river, a small town, a parish, a sub-district, a district, and a hundred in Salop. The river rises near the boundary with Wales; and runs 11 miles eastward, and 7 southward, to the Teme, near Leintwardine. The town stands on the river, 3 miles W of Offa’s dyke, 5 ½ SSW of Bishops-Castle, and 6 ½ N by E of Knighton r. station; is a polling-place, and a nominal borough, governed by a bailiff and 30 burgesses, under Earl Powis, gives the title of Baron to the Duke of Norfolk; and has a head post-office, a hotel, a town-hall, a five-arched bridge, a ruined ancient castle, a parish church, two dissenting chapels, and a hospital for poor men, under a master or warden. The castle was built, in the time of Henry III, by the Fitzalans; and destroyed by Owen Glendower. The town-hall is a modern structure on arches. The church is partly Norman; and has a font and monuments. The hospital was founded, in 1614, by Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton; is a plain quadrangular edifice, with a chapel; and has an endowed income of £1,530. A weekly market is held on Wednesday; and fairs on Whit-Monday and Nov. 22. – The parish comprises also the division of Ediclift or Bicton, containing the townships of Ediclift, Bicton, Whitcott-Keyset, and Shadwell; the division of Newcastle, containing the townships of Newcastle, Spoad, Whitcot-Evan, and part of Kevencalonog; and the division of Hopebendrid or Treverward, containing the townships of Hopebendrid, Treverward, Menutton, Perlogne, and Obarris. Acres, 19,782. Rated property, £14,070. Pop., 2,338. Houses, 482. The property is much subdivided. The manor belonged early to the Fitzalans; went, in the time of Elizabeth, to the Dukes of Norfolk; and passed to the Walcots and the Earls of Powis. There are several ancient British and Roman remains, particularly at Offa’s dyke, the Bury ditches, and Caer-Caradoc. The living is a vicarage, united with the p. curacy of Chapel-Lawn, in the diocese of Hereford. Value, £680. Patron, the Earl of Powis. The p. curacy of Newcastle is a separate benefice. – The sub-district contains the parishes of Clun, Clungunford, Clunbury, and Hopton-Castle. Acres, 31,358. Pop., 4,152. Houses, 836. The district comprehends also the sub-district of Norbury, containing the parishes of Norbury, More, Ratlinghope, Wentnor, and Mindtown; the sub-districts North Lydbury, containing the parishes of North Lydbury, Edgton, and Hopesay, and the extra-parochial tracts of Horderly Hall, Hill-end, Old-Church-moor, and Dinmore; and the sub-district of Bishops-Castle, containing the town and liberties of Bishops-Castle, the parishes of Shelve, Hyssington, and Snead – the last wholly, the next partly, in Montgomery – and the greater of the parishes of Mainstone and Lydham. Acres, 82,886. Poor-rates in 1862, £6,466. Pop. in 1841, 10,022; in 1861, 10,615. Houses, 2,120. Marriages in 1860, 82; births, 338, - of which 32 were illegitimate; deaths, 194, - of which 63 were at ages under 5 years, and 11 at ages above 85. Marriages in the ten years 1851-60,667; births, 3,235; deaths, 1,911. The places of worship in 1851 were 19 of the Church of England, with 4,080 sittings; 3 of Independents, with 288 s.; 2 of Baptists, with 90 s.; 3 of Wesleyan Methodists, with 150 s.; 21 of Primitive Methodists, with 1,056 s.; and 1 of Roman Catholics, with 40 s. The schools were 12 public day schools, with 576 scholars; 8 private day schools, with 153 s.; and 7 Sunday schools, with 428 s. The workhouse is in Bishops-Castle. – The hundred consists of two divisions, Clun and Mainstone; the former conterminate with Clun parish, the latter containing three parishes and part of another. Acres of the Mainstone division, 21,315. Pop., 3,869. Houses, 773.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Clun Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Clun. A parish in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun, a vicarage, in the diocese of Hereford, the deanery of Clun, and archdeaconry of Salop. 324 houses, 2,781 inhabitants. 5 miles south-west by south of Bishopscastle. It derives its name from its river Colun, or Clun. It is an insignificant and neglected town, and possesses little worthy of observation, except its castle, which has long been a ruin. It was erected in the reign of Henry the third, by William Fitz-alan, to one of whose ancestors the manor had devolved by marriage to the family of Say. John, the son of William, was captain-general of the forces, commanding the Welsh marshes, and this castle was, in those turbulent times, a stronghold for warriors, and a receptacle of their plunder. It remained in his line, down to the reign of Queen Elizabeth, when the last earl died. By the marriage of Mary Fitz-alan, with Philip Howard, the son of Thomas Duke of Norfolk, it became vested in that noble family. From thence it passed to the Walcotts, and afterwards by purchase to Lord Clive, in whose family it continues. The Duke of Norfolk still retains the title of Baron of Clun. Fairs, Whitsunday, and Nov. 22; the last is a great fair for sheep. See appendix.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Clun Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Q. Describe Clun.

A. Clun is a small decayed town, or rather village, five miles from Bishop’s Castle, deriving its name from the neighbouring river. It is remarkable merely for the ruins of its castle, once an extensive and strong fortress, erected by William Fitz-Alan, in the reign of Henry III. Clun gives the title of baron to the Duke of Norfolk.

Q. What is remarkable in the vicinity of Clun ?

A. A little to the north-east of Clun is Walcot Park, the noble seat of Earl Powis *. The mansion, which is of brick, with stone corners, and a Doric portico, stands on a gently rising eminence. The approach to it is embellished by lofty trees, and a fine expanse of water. The park is very extensive, and the disposition of its various ornaments evinces the fine taste of its noble proprietor.

Q. What remains of antiquity are within the boundary of this domain ?

A. On an eminence near the road, called Tongley, are the vestiges of a British encampment, of a circular form, called the Bury Ditches. The area of the camp is defended by three deep trenches, with high mounds and ramparts.

* Robert Clive, the founder of this noble family, was the son of a gentleman of small estate, who practised the law. He was born September 29, 1725, and at a proper age went to Madras, as a writer in the East India Company’s service. Preferring however the sword to the pen, he in 1747, obtained an ensigncy, and, by his talents and bravery, rose by degrees to be governor-general of Fort William, and commander-in-chief of the king’s and company’s forces in Bengal. At this time the affairs of the company were almost desperate; they possessed no territory, one of their factories was in ruins, and a powerful army preparing to drive them from their principal settlement. By the courage and conduct of Clive, however, things soon wore a different aspect, and in the space of ten years these humble merchants became powerful princes, possessed of large revenues, and ruling over fifteen millions of subjects. For these, and other important services, Mr. Clive was made a peer in 1762, by the title of Lord Clive, of Plassey, in Ireland. His exertions in the burning climate of India, injured his constitution, and soon after his return to England he laboured under a depression of spirits, and died Nov. 22, 1774, in the fiftieth year of his age. His son Edward, second Lord Clive; was born March 7, 1754, and in 1794 was made an English peer, by the title of Lord Clive, of Walcot. In consequence of his marriage with the sister and heiress of Earl Powis, he was on the death of that nobleman created Viscount Clive and Earl Powis. The family motto is—Audaciter et sinceré — Boldly and ingenuously.

Source: The History and Topography of Shropshire; William Pinnock Jolibois; 1820.

Clunton Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Clunton. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Stow division of the hundred of Purslow. 4 ½ miles south of Bishopscastle.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Clungonas Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Clungonas. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Stow division of the hundred of Purslow.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824.

Clunbury and Brompton Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Clunbury and Brompton. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Stow division of the hundred of Purslow. Clunbury is a curacy not in charge, in the diocese of Hereford, the deanery of Clun, and archdeaconry of Salop.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Newcastle Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Newcastle. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun. 37 houses, 315 inhabitants. 6 ½ miles south-west of Bishopscastle.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Perlogue Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Perlogue. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun. 8 miles south-west of Bishopscastle.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Shadwell Shropshire Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Shadwell, a township in Clun parish, Salop; 4 ¼ miles SW of Bishops-Castle. Pop., 59.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Poll Books

Clun Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Below are the names of those that voted in the election of July 1865 between Col. The Hon. P. E. Herbert, Sir Baldwin Leighton, Bart., and R. Jasper More, Esq. 

Poll Book of the Election, July 1865 for the Southern Division of Shropshire.

Clun Polling District

Clun, Parish of

1862 Adams Richard, dead

1863 Addis John

1864 Beamond William

1865 Beamond Edward

1866 Beavan Francis

1867 Beavan William

1868 Booton Thomas

1869 Bright John

1870 Bright Jeremiah

1871 Bright Richard

1872 Bright Richard, see 2215

1873 Bright Charles, see 2166

1874 Bright Thomas, see 2167

1875 Bryan Edward Bryan Jones

1876 Brown Francis

1877 Brown Thomas

1878 Bradley William

1879 Bubb William

1880 Burton Robert Lingen, see 3649

1881 Carter Robert, see 1779

1882 Cheese William

1883 Cheese William, jun.

1884 Chelmick William

1885 Coke William Clark

1886 Collins John

1887 Cooke John

1888 Cotrill Richard

1889 Cound James

1890 Cresswell Henry, The Rev.

1891 Davies Edward

1892 Davies John, see 1895

1893 Davies Robert

1894 Davies John

1895 Davies John, see 1895

1896 Davies John, dead

1897 Davies John

1898 Davies Thomas

1899 Davies Thomas

1900 Davies William

1901 Davies James

1902 Downes William

1903 Drew Vincent

1904 Edwards Richard, see 2413

1905 Edwards William

1906 Edwards William, jun.

1907 Edwards John

1908 Edwards Richard

1909 Edwards James

1910 Edwards John

1911 Edwards Edward, see 48

1912 Evans Edward

1913 Evans John

1914 Evans John

1915 Evans Thomas

1916 Everall John, see 326, 2076

1917 Farmer John

1918 Fletcher Henry

1919 Fletcher Richard

1920 Fletcher William

1921 Francis Richard

1922 Francis William

1923 Francis Benjamin

1924 Francis Edward

1925 Francis John

1926 Francis John

1927 Fletcher Joseph

1928 Gittins Thomas

1929 Gittins William

1930 Gittins Richard

1931 Gough John

1932 Gough John

1933 Gough Thomas

1934 Gough William

1935 Gough David

1936 Gough David

1937 Gough Richard

1938 Gough Richard

1939 Gough Richard-the younger

1940 Gough Thomas, see 2183

1941 Green William

1942 Green William

1943 Griffiths Henry

1944 Gwilliam Benjamin

1945 Gwilliam Edward, see 624

1946 Gwilt Nathaniel

1947 Gwilt Richard

1948 Hatfield George

1949 Hamer Henry

1950 Hamer Samuel

1951 Hamer Thomas

1952 Hamer William

1953 Hamer Henry

1954 Hamer John

1955 Hamer Thomas, jun.

1956 Hamer Thomas

1957 Hamer Henry

1958 Hamer James

1959 Harthill Jeremiah, see 906

1960 Harley Edward

1961 Haynes John

1962 Haynes Richard

1963 Heighway Parry Thomas

1964 Holyoake Thomas

1965 Herbert George, the Hon. and Rev.

1966 Herbert Percy Egerton, Hon.

1967 Herbert Robert Charles, The Hon.

1968 Jackson Thomas, dead

1969 Jackson James

1970 Jones Edward

1971 Jones Thomas

1972 Jones John

1973 Jones Richard

1974 Jones Thomas, see 2190

1975 Jones Thomas

1976 Jones Thomas, dead

1977 Jones Thomas

1978 Jones Richard

1979 Jones Edward

1980 Jones Walter

1981 Law John

1982 Law William

1983 Langford John

1984 Lee Jeremiah

1985 Lewis Jeremiah

1986 Leighton James

1987 Lloyd John

1988 Lloyd Richard Thomas

1989 Lingen William

1990 Lansett Richard

1991 Luther John

1992 Luther John

1993 Luther Thomas

1994 Luther William

1995 Mason William

1996 Mason Richard

1997 Matthews Thomas

1998 Matthews Philip Morris, 1844

1999 Matthews Richard

2000 Meredith William, the younger, see 2194

2001 Middleton Richard Edwards, see 2120

2002 Middleton Thomas, see 2155

2003 Miles Samuel

2004 Morris Thomas

2005 Morris Philip

2006 Morris Edward Rowley, jun.

2007 Morris Thomas

2008 Morris Herbert

2009 Moore Thomas

2010 Morgan Alfred Fairfax

2011 Morgan Evan

2012 Morgan Thomas

2013 Oldbury Charles

2014 Owen Henry Harris

2015 Owen John

2016 Parry Richard

2017 Parry Richard, dead

2018 Parry William

2019 Price Thomas

2020 Price George

2021 Pryce Richard

2022 Pryce Thomas

2023 Pryce Charles

2024 Pritchard Edward

2025 Pritchard Edwin

2026 Powell Richard

2027 Pugh Samuel

2028 Ratcliff Henry

2029 Rawlings Francis

2030 Rawlings John

2031 Rickards John

2032 Richards John, see 1823

2033 Roberts Robert

2034 Robinson John, see 253

2035 Russell James

2036 Sankey John, see 282

2037 Selley George

2038 Sheen Dantsey

2039 Smith John

2040 Southam Robert

2041 Smith Samuel

2042 Statham William

2043 Steadman Edward, see 1856

2044 Stedman James

2045 Swainson Edward Christopher, see 1395

2046 Tanner Edward, see 2706

2047 Thomas Edmond

2048 Tilsley William

2049 Ward Thomas

2050 Watkin Evan

2051 Wellings John

2052 Weyman Thomas

2053 Weyman William, the Rev.

2054 Whittall John

2055 Whittall Thomas

2056 Whiston John

2057 Wilson John

2058 Williams Thomas

2059 Williams Thomas

2060 Williams Thomas

2061 Williams Thomas, jun.

Directories

Clun Aubrey Shropshire Directory 1925

Bakers

Morris A.

Bookmakers

Jones A G

Builders and Contractors

Cooke J & Son, Clun; undertakers, cabinetmakers and joiners; Tel add “Cooke, Clun”

Butchers

S. Evans, Market Square, Clun. Purveyor of Best English Meat. Deliveries in the country weekly.

Gittings T.

Cabinetmakers

Cooke J & Son, Clun; workshop.

Chemists

Darroll W

Cycle Agents

Mead W, Clun. Petrol on sale

Drapers

Clee J.

Coles A. J.

Fancy Goods Dealers

Haynes R, Ford St.

Luther J. T., It High St., Clun; also newsagent & stationer, picture postcards, local views. Also tobacconist.

Grocers

Head William, Clun. Also provision merchant, Ironmonger & seedsman, agricultural implements. Tel. add, “Mead, Clun”. Tel No. 4.

Morris A

Williams R P.

Hotels

Buffalo Hotel

Vaughan’s Temperance Hotel

White Horse Hotel

Inns

Crown

Sun Inn, Clun; good stabling accommodation for visitors, J. T. Thornton, prop.

Tile Tavern, Clun, H. Griffiths, proprietor.

Motor Engineers

Wood A. H. & Peplow H., Clun-side Garage. Clun.

Painters & Decorators

Wilson Fredrick, Castle Inn, Castle St.

Printers

Haynes R.

Saddlers

Williams T.

Tailors

Moreland J, Church St.

Undertakers

Cooke J. & Son., Clun. Tel. add “Cooke, Clun.”

Veterinary Surgeons

Darroll W.

Source: Herefordshire, Shropshire & Monmouthshire Directory 1925. Printers & Publishers, Aubrey & Co., Leamore, Walsall.

Administration

  • County: Shropshire
  • Civil Registration District: Clun
  • Probate Court: Court of the Bishop of Hereford (Episcopal Consistory)
  • Diocese: Hereford
  • Rural Deanery: Clun
  • Poor Law Union: Clun
  • Hundred: Clun
  • Province: Canterbury