Abson and Wick Gloucestershire Family History Guide

Photo of St. James, Abson by Bob&Anne Powell, some rights reserved.


Abson and Wick is a parish in Gloucestershire.

Alternative names: Abson-cum-Wick, Wick and Abson.

Other places in the parish include: Holybrook, Bridgegate or Bridge Yate.

Parish church: Abson, St. James; Wick, St. Bartholomew (consecrated 1850).

Parish registers begin: 1687

Nonconformists include: Independent/Congregational and Wesleyan Methodist.

Parishes adjacent to Abson and Wick

  • Warmley
  • Syston
  • Doynton
  • Bitton
  • Pucklechurch

Historical Descriptions

Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Abson, Abston, or Abbotston, a village and a parish in Chipping-Sodbury district, Gloucester. The village stands on a small tributary of the Avon, 3 miles SE of Mangotsfield r. station, and 7 E by N of Bristol. The parish contains also the villages of Bridgegate and Holbrook; and is sometimes called Abson-cum-Wick, and sometimes Wick and Abson. Post-town, Wick under Bath. Acres, 2,315. Real property, £5,541. Pop., 833. Houses, 185. The manor belonged to the abbey of Glastonbury, passed to the see of Bath and Wells, and was purchased by Henry VIII. An abrupt rocky hill, about 200 feet high, adjacent to Abson village, shows vestiges of an ancient camp. Tog hill was the scene of Sir Ralph Hopton’s defeat of the parliamentary forces in 1643. Roman coins and urns have been found. The living is a p. curacy, united to the vicarage of Pucklechurch, in the diocese of Gloucester and Bristol.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Absom with Wick, 4 miles N. W. Chipping-Sodbury. P. 794.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

Abson, Abston, or Abbotston, a chapelry in the parish and hund. of Pucklechurch, Chipping-Sodbury union, county of Gloucester; 7 miles east by north from Bristol. It includes the hamlets of Wick, Berdwick, Church-Eight, and Holybrook. Living, a curacy united to the vicarage of Pucklechurch, in the archd. of Gloucester and dio. of Gloucester and Bristol. The manor of Abson anciently belonged to the abbey of Glastonbury; it was afterwards annexed to the see of Bath and Wells, but purchased by Henry VIII. Pop., in 1801, 571; in 1831, 824. Houses 159. Acres 2,170. A. P. £5,219. Poor rates, in 1837, £283. Above the village of Abson, rises a rocky perpendicular hill to the height of above 200 feet, consisting of alternate strata of limestone and petrosilex. In the vicinity are vestiges of an ancient camp. — At Toghill, in this parish, Sir Ralph Hopton defeated the parliamentary forces in 1643. The battle lasted nearly twelve hours.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1840.

A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland 1833

Abson With Wyke, co. Gloucester.

P. T. Bristol (114) 7 m. E b N. Pop. 715.

A parochial chapelry, including the hamlets of Bordwick, Church, Eight, and Holybrook. Church ded. to St. James; subject to vicar of Pucklechurch.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. I; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom 1808

Abston, a small township united with Wick, in the parish of Pucklechurch, Gloucester; containing; 111 houses and 571 inhabitants, 7 miles from Bristol. Here are the remains of some old fortifications. Near it is a field called the Castler, where remain three monumental stones, erected in 577 for three British chiefs, from Chevelin, slain in battle near this place. A dark coloured stone produced here, and burned into lime, makes excellent terras.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom. Benjamin Pitts Capper. 1808.

Directories

Abson and Wick Gloucestershire 1876

Abson and Wick are two villages, forming a parish in Chipping Sodbury union, containing, by the census of 1861, 833, and in 1871, 838 inhabitants, and 2315 acres, in the deanery of Hawkesbury, archdeaconry of Bristol, diocese of Gloucester and Bristol, hundred of Pucklechurch, West Gloucestershire; 3 miles south-east from Mangotsfield Station on the Bristol and Birmingham Railway, 7 east from Bristol, 7 north-west from Bath, 7 south-west from Chipping Sodbury, and 113 from London ; on the old road from Bath to Bristol, and on the river Boyd. The living is a chapelry, with that of Westerleigh annexed to the vicarage of Pucklechurch, in the incumbency of the Rev. Thomas Boucher Coney, M.A., honorary canon of Bristol and rural dean, and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Wells; joint annual value £750. The church, dedicated to St. James, is an ancient edifice in the Early English style, consisting of nave, chancel, and porch, with tower containing a peal of six bells. There is a National School for children of both sexes, with residence for the master. The Independents and Wesleyans have places of worship here. Lead, tin, and coal, have been dug in the parish. Mr. James Tolman is lord of the manor.

Wick is a village about 1½ mile south, situate in the midst of a beautiful romantic valley, through which the river Boyd passes, and for three-quarters of a mile runs between rocks, which rise in some places above 200 feet from the level. At the northern extremity of these hills are the remains of a Roman camp, which extend over about 12 acres, and contain several cottages ; it is oblong, and was defended on three sides by a double Callum and broad ditch. Some Druidical stones, about 5 feet high, exist in a field near Tracey Park. The rocks produce the sparry substance known as the “Bristol diamonds.” A new church, dedicated to St. Bartholmew, capable of seating 400 persons, was consecrated in April, 1850.

Bridgeyate, or Bridgate, and Holybrook, are hamlets of the above parish, the former being a polling-place for the Western Division of Gloucestershire. The rateable value of this parish is £4205.

Abson.

Sommerville Mrs. Ann, Bridgeyate house

Trades and Professions.

Anstee Edward, farmer

Bryant Henry, shopkeeper

Harrington Thomas, gardener and parish clerk

Jefferis Leonard and Thomas, builders, timber merchants, and carriage builders, Bridgeyate

Marshall Henry, farmer

Perry John, lime burner and farmer

Perry Mark, farmer

Perry Matthew, farmer, Highfield

Perry Richard, farmer

Perry William, farmer

Pow William, Jun., “White Hart” inn, Bridgeyate

Watts Worthy, farmer, Bridgeyate

Willshire, Charles, farmer

Young Nathaniel, “Griffin” hotel (good stabling), Bridgeyate

Wick.

Gentry.

Ashley Jacob, Esq., The Lawn

Chitt Miss Sarah

Trades and Professions.

Amos Samuel, tailor

Amer Mrs. Sarah, farmer and limeburner, Bury house

Amos Henry, farmer, Lime Brook farm

Amos Samuel, tailor

Ashley Jacob, surgeon, The Lawn

Batterbury J. H., “Crown”

Bedford William, farmer and cattle dealer, Bridgeyate

Boughton Henry, shopkeeper, Bridgeyate

Bryan George, carpenter and wheelwright

Bryant Henry, shopkeeper

Dare Frederick, miller and farmer

Davis John, farmer

Downs Thomas Beames, miller

England Job, farmer

Fussell James, farmer

Gunning John, farmer, Holybrook

Gunning William, mason

Heming William, wheelwright, carpenter, and builder

Jones F. F., commission agent, Wick court

Lyle Samuel, mason and shopkeeper

Lyle Miss, dressmaker

Matthews Henry, farmer, Cold Harbor farm

Mills Joseph, miller, Wick New mills

Mizen Reuben, farmer

Nelms Guy, farmer

Nowell Charles, shopkeeper and sub-postmaster

Packer James, blacksmith

Pritchard Charles, farmer

Phipps Samuel and Brothers, plate and sheet iron manufacturers, Iron Rolling mills

Sahker James, “Carpenters’ Arms”

William James and Joseph, plasterers and tilers, Holybrook

Williams Enos, farmer

Post Office - Charles Nowell, sub-postmaster. Letters from Bath arrive at 9 a.m., dispatched at 3 p.m. Kingswood is the nearest money order office.

Source: Morris & Co.’s commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Gloucestershire with Bristol and Monmouth. Second Edition. Hounds Gate, Nottingham. 1876.

Abson and Wick Kellys Gloucestershire Directory 1863

Abson-cum-Wick is a parish and village, 4 miles east from Keynsham railway station, 7 east from Bristol, 7 north-east from Bath, 7 south-west from Chipping Sodbury, 3 south-east from Mangotsfield railway station, and 113 from London, in Pucklechurch hundred, Chipping Sodbury union and county court district, West Gloucestershire, rural deanery of Hawkesbury, Bristol archdeaconry, and Gloucester and Bristol bishopric. It is situated on the river Boyd, the old road from Bath to Bristol running through the parish. The church of St. James is an old stone building, with square tower, in the Early English style, and has been repaired; it has nave, chancel, porch, organ, font, two monuments, and 6 bells. The living is a chapelry, annexed to Pucklechurch, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Wells; the Rev. Thomas Boucher Coney, M.A., of Balliol College, Oxford, rural dean, is the incumbent; the Rev. Thomas Crossley, M.A., of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, is the curate. There are chapels for Independents and Wesleyans; also a small National school for boys and girls, with residence for the master. Lead, tin, and coal are found in this parish. The population in 1861 was 833; and the acreage is 2,315. The soil is loamy; the subsoil is chiefly rock. Messrs. Batterbury and Tolman are lords of the manor; and Mr. Batterbury and the Drummond family are chief landowners.

Wick is a portion of the parish of Abson, from which it is distant 1 mile and a half south, on the Bath and Bristol road. It is situated in a beautiful and romantic valley, through which runs the river Boyd; but the most remarkable objects of attraction are The Rocks, great natural curiosities, formed on each side of a deep glen, about three-quarters of a mile in length, and rising in some places to above 200 feet in height. There is a beautiful sparry substance found on them in many places, called rock, or Bristol, diamonds. On the summit of the northern cliff is a fine Roman camp: its form is oblong, and it is defended on three sides by a broad ditch and double vallum; the interior contains about 12 acres of land and several cottages. In a field near Tracey Park are two large stones, about five feet high, said to be the remains of Druidical monuments erected to British chiefs. A new church (St. Bartholomew’s) was finished and consecrated in April, 1850; it is in the Early English style; the altar-rail, choir screen, stalls and pulpit are of oak; the font is of Pennant stone. It will afford accommodation for 400 persons. Here are two iron rolling mills.

Cold Harbour, Lime Brook, Tog Hill, and Highfield are farms. Bridge Yate is a polling-place for the western division of the county. Holybrook and Bridgegate, or Bridge Yate, are hamlets in the parish of Abson-cum-Wick.

Parish Clerk, John Harrington.

Abson.

Saunders Wm. esq. Bridge Yate house

COMMERCIAL.

Camery Joseph, farmer

Harrington John, gardener

Hoskins Edwd. White Hart, Bridge yate

Jefferis Leonard, carpenter, builder & timber dealer, Bridge yate

Jefferis Thomas, carpenter & blacksmith, Bridge yate

Marshall Henry, farmer

Perry & Oakford, lime burners

Perry Henry, beer retailer

Perry Mark, farmer

Perry Matthew, farmer, Highfield

Perry Richard, farmer

Perry William, farmer

Saunders Sarah (Mrs.), farmer, Bridge yate

Sparrow John, farmer. Bridge yate

Summerhill Thomas, farmer

Wakefield John, farmer

Wall James, farmer

Letters are received through Wick

Wick.

Ashley Jacob, esq

Chitt Miss Sarah

Cole Capt. Thomas Henry

Hyatt Mrs. Wick green

Syle Mrs. Rose cottage, Bridge yate

Woodward Mrs.

COMMERCIAL.

Amos Henry, farmer, Lime Brook farm

Amos Samuel, tailor

Ashley Jacob, surgeon

Batterbury John Hen. farmer, Wick crt

Bedford Wm. farmer & cattle dealer

Boughton Henry, shopkpr. Bridge yate

Britten William, beer retailer

Bryan Wm. carpenter & wheelwright

Bryant Henry, shopkeeper

Davis James, Crown

Downs Thomas Beams, miller

Edmonds David, iron merchant & iron forger, Iron rolling mills

Edwards Mary (Mrs.), shopkeeper

Eyles William, miller

Gibbs William, farmer & lime burner, Wick rocks

Gooderep John Michael, farmer

Gunning William, mason

Heming William, wheelwright, carpenter & builder

Higgins William, iron merchant & Iron works, Boyd’s iron forge

Holloway James, farmer, Wilks’s farm

Kidd George Edward, farmer

Knapp Richard, farmer

Mathews Hy.farmer,Cold Harbour farm

Mizen John, farmer, Holybrook

Mizen Reuben, farmer

Nelms Guy, farmer

Nelms John, farmer

Nowell Charles, shopkeeper

Packer Edwin, tiler & plasterer

Packer James, blacksmith

Packer Joseph, shoemaker

Pritchard Isaac, farmer

Smallcombe Isaac, farmer, Holybrook

Williams John, shopkeeper, builder, plasterer, tiler & beer retlr. Holybrook

Young Thomas, Carpenters’ Arms

Post Office. — Charles Nowell, receiver. Letters from Bath arrive at 9 a.m.; dispatched at 3 p.m. The nearest money order office is at Keynsham.

National School, George Malcomber, master; Mrs. F. Malcomber, mistress.

Source: Post Office Directory of Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Shropshire and the City of Bristol, Printed and Published by Kelly and Co., Old Boswell Court, St. Clement’s, Strand, London. 1863.

Abston Kellys Gloucestershire Directory 1856

Abston, with Wick, forms a township, parish and village, 4 miles east from Keynsham railway station, 7 east from Bristol, 7 north-east from Bath, 6 south-west from Chipping Sodbury, 3 south-east from Mangotsfield railway station, and 113 from London, in Pucklechurch Hundred, Chipping Sodbury Union, West Gloucestershire, Bristol archdeaconry, and Gloucester and Bristol bishopric. It is situated on the river Boyd, the old road from Bath to Bristol running through the parish. The church of St. James is an old some building, with square tower, in the early English style, and has lately been repaired; it has nave, chancel, porch, organ, font, two monuments, and 6 bells. The living is annexed to Pucklechurch, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Wells; the Rev. Thomas Boucher Coney, M.A., is the incumbent; the Rev. G. Butterfield is the curate. There are chapels for Independents and Wesleyans; also a small National school for boys and girls, with residence for the master. Lead, tin, and coal are found in this parish. The population, in 1851, was 826; and the acreage is 2,315 acres. The soil is loamy; the subsoil is chiefly rock. Richard Hayne, Esq., is lord of the manor; and Mr. Hayne and Miss Drumond are chief landowners.

Wick is a hamlet in the parish of Abston, from which it is distant 1 ½ miles south, on the Bath and Bristol road. It is situated in a beautiful and romantic valley, through which runs the river Boyd; but the most remarkable object of attraction is the rocks, a great natural curiosity, formed on each side of a deep glen, about three quarters of a mile in length, and rising in some places to above 200 feet in height. There is a beautiful sparry substance found on them in many places, called rock or Bristol diamonds. On the summit of the northern cliff is a fine Roman Camp; its form is oblong, and is defended an three sides by a broad ditch and double vallum; the interior contains about 12 acres of land, and several cottages. In a field near Tracey Park are several large stones, about five feet high, and said to be the remains of Druidical monuments, erected to British chiefs. A new church was finished and consecrated in April, 1850, dedicated to St. Bartholomew. It is in the early English style; the altar-rail, choir, screen, stalls and pulpit are of oak; the font is of Pennant stone. It will afford accommodation for 400 persons. Holybrook and Bridgegate, or Bridge Yate, are villages in this township. Here are Rolling Iron Mill and Boyd Iron Mill. Cold Harbour, Lime Brook, Tog Hill, and High field, are farms. Bridge Yate is a polling place for the Western division of the county.

Abston.

Saunders William, esq. Bridge Yate house

Traders

Bryan James, farmer

Camery Joseph, farmer & beer retailer

Harrington John, parish clerk & gardener

Hudd – , lime burner

Jefferis Leonard, carpenter, builder & timber dealer, Bridge Yate

Jefferis Thomas, carpenter & blacksmith, Bridge Yate

Marshall Henry, farmer

Perry David, farmer

Perry Henry, beer retailer, surveyor of roads & assistant overseer

Perry Matthew, farmer

Perry William, farmer & beer retailer

Saunders John, farmer, Bridge Yate

Sparrow John, farmer, Bridge Yate

Summervill Thomas, farmer

Trubody Thomas, “White Hart,’ Bridge Yate

Wakefield John, farmer

Wilmot Robert, farmer, Bridge Yate

Wick.

Gentry.

Ashley Jacob, esq

Boulton Thomas, esq

Butterfield Rev. George, Wick court

Chitt Miss Sarah

Cole Capt. Thomas Henry

Syle Mrs. Rose Cottage, Bridge Yate

Woodward Mrs.

Traders.

Allen Moses, shoemaker, Holybrook

Amos Henry, farmer, Lime brook farm

Amos Samuel, tailor

Amos William, ‘Crown’

Ashley Emma (Mrs.), shopkeeper

Ashley Jacob, surgeon

Ashley Samuel, farmer & lime burner, Wick rocks

Bedford Wm. farmer & cattle dealer

Boughton Henry, shopkpr. Bridge Yate

Brain George, shoemaker

Britten William, beer retailer

Bryan Daniel, tailor

Bryan Wm. carpenter & wheelwright

Crew Henry, farmer, Toghill farm

Davis Edward, shoemaker

Downs Thomas Beams, miller

Edmonds David, iron merchant & iron forger, Iron rolling mills

Edwards George, shopkeeper

Gibbs Moses, farmer, Highfield farm

Gibbs Wm. farmer, Highfield Lodge farm

Gooderep John Michael, farmer

Gunning William, mason

Heming Elizabeth (Miss), schoolmistress

Heming William, wheelwright, carpenter & builder

Holloway James, farmer, Wilks’s farm

Hyatt Henry, miller

Kidd George Edwd. Carpenter & farmer

Knapp Richard, farmer, Wick court

Knight George Toghill, ‘Carpenters’ Arms,’ & postmaster

Lambert Emily (Miss), schoolmistress

Mathews Hy. farmer, Cold Harbour farm

Mayberry Margaret (Mrs.), iron merchant & iron works, Boyd iron forge

Mizen John, farmer, Holybrook

Mizen Reuben, farmer

Nelms Guy, farmer

Nelms John, farmer

Nowell Charles, shoemaker

Packer James, blacksmith

Packer Joseph, shoemaker

Packer Samuel, tiler & plasterer

Pritchard Isaac, farmer

Smallcombe Isaac, farmer, Holybrook

Williams John, shopkeeper, builder, plasterer, tiler & beer retlr. Holybrook

POST OFFICE. – George Toghill Knight, receiver. Letters from Bath arrive at 12 a.m.; dispatched at ½ past 2 p.m. The nearest money order office is at Keynsham.

Source:Post Office Directory of Gloucestershire with Bath and Bristol. Printed and Published by Kelly and Co., 19, 20 & 21, Old Boswell Court, St. Clement’s, Strand, London. 1856.

Administration

  • County: Gloucestershire
  • Civil Registration District: Chipping Sodbury
  • Probate Court: Court of the Bishop of Gloucester (Episcopal Consistory)
  • Diocese: Gloucester and Bristol
  • Rural Deanery: Hawkesbury
  • Poor Law Union: Chipping Sodbury
  • Hundred: Pucklechurch
  • Province: Canterbury
  • Petty Sessional Division:
  • Couty Court District: Chipping Sodbury