St. Briavels

St. Briavels, Gloucestershire Family History

St Briavels is a chapelry of Lydney Ancient Parish in Gloucestershire.

Alternative names: St Briavells

Other places in the parish include: Brockweir, The Fence, Mawkins Hazells, Forest Fence and the Fence, Forest Fence, and Mawkins Hayells.

Parish church: St. Mary

Parish registers begin: 1664

Nonconformists include:

Parishes adjacent to St. Briavels

  • Bearse Common
  • Hewelsfield
  • Alvington
  • Aylburton
  • St Briavels Castle
  • Mocking Hazell Wood
  • Hudnalls with St Briavel’s Common
  • Dean Forest St Paul
  • Bream
  • Newland
  • Tintern Parva
  • Llandogo

Historical Descriptions

St. Briavels

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Briavel’s (St.), a parish in the hund. of St. Briavell’s, county of Gloucester; 7 miles north of Chepstow, on the eastern bank of the river Wye. Living, a curacy annexed to the vicarage of Lydney. The church is a small cruciform edifice of great antiquity. There are two daily schools in this parish. A weekly market was formerly held here under a charter of Edward II., who likewise conferred on the inhabitants the right of passing toll-free all over the kingdom, — a privilege now obsolete. The market has also fallen into disuse. A court is held here for regulating all matters in dispute between miners in the neighbouring coal-works. Its jurisdiction extends over the whole hundred, concurrently with the other tribunals. The suits cognizable in this court are actions in the nature of debt, or contract, or for injury to personal property. The court sits every third Monday, except during vacations. A castle was erected here in the reign of Henry I., as a frontier defence against the Welsh. Of this structure only a small portion remains, in which the officers of the hundred hold their courts; and in part of which are cells used as prisons for the debtors and delinquents in the Forest. It is in a dilapidaied condition. The moat still remains, and also some vestiges of Offa’s dyke. The duke of Beaufort, as lord of the manor, holds the office of constable or governor of St. Briavel’s castle, — a sinecure charge. Pop., in 1801, 670; in 1831, 1,124. Houses 224. Acres 4,710. A. P. £2,894. Poor rates, in 1837, £267.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851

Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Briavells (St.), 2 miles S. Colford. P. 1287.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland 1833

Briavell’s, St., co. Gloucester.

P. T. Blakeney (123) 8 m. W b S. Pop. 1112

A parish in the hundred of the same name; living, a curacy, subordinate to the vicarage of Lydney, in the archdeaconry of Hereford and diocese of Gloucester, not in charge; patronage with Lydney vicarage. The village was formerly of greater extent than at present, and was once regarded as a borough and market-town, the inhabitants of which were exempted from toll throughout the kingdom. These privileges are now obsolete, but the parishioners still possess the right of cutting wood, but not timber, in the coppices within a certain extensive district on the banks of the Wye, called Hudnells; by which means Bristol is served with a vast number of hoops for the West Indies, as also with poles, faggots, and similar articles. Here is a castle, erected by Milo de Fitzwalter, in the reign of Henry I., the remains of which are still competent to serve as a prison for the district, and the officers of the hundred also assemble in it to hold their courts. The Earls of Berkeley, as lords of the manor, retain the sinecure office of constable.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. I; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

Brockweir

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Brooks-Weir, or Brockware, a village in the parishes of St. Briavell’s, Huelsfield, and Wollastone, hund. of St. Briavell’s, county of Gloucester; 5 miles north of Chepstow, on the eastern bank of the Wye. It is a place of some trade and activity. Vessels belonging to Bristol ascend the river to this place, for the purpose of receiving goods brought from Hereford and Monmouth in barges on the Wye. The tide seldom flows to any considerable height above Brooks-Weir, except during spring-tides.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

Directories

St. Briavels Kellys Gloucestershire Directory 1863

Administration

  • County: Gloucestershire
  • Civil Registration District: Chepstow
  • Probate Court: Post-1541 - Court of the Bishop of Gloucester (Episcopal Consistory), Pre-1541 - Court of the Bishop of Hereford
  • Diocese: Gloucester and Bristol
  • Rural Deanery: Forest
  • Poor Law Union: Chepstow
  • Hundred: St Briavels
  • Province: Canterbury