Ellesmere, Shropshire Family History Guide

Ellesmere is an Ancient Parish partly in Flintshire.

The parish includes the townships of Ellesmere, Colemere, Crickett, Criftins, Eastwick, Elson-with-Greenhill, Birch and Lythe, Cockshutt and Crosemere, Frankton, Hamptons-Wood, Hardwick, Kenwicks-with-Stockett and Whettall, Kenwicks-Park, Kenwicks-Wood, Lee, Lyneal, New Marton, Newnes, Northwood, Oteley-with-Newton and Spoonhill, Ridges, Stocks-with-Coptivinney, Tetchill-with-French, and the chapelry of Dudleston, in Salop, and the chapelry of Penley in Flint. The p. curacies of Cockshutt, Dudleston, and Penley are separate benefices.

Parish church:

Parish registers begin: 1654

Nonconformists include: Independent/Congregational, Particular Baptist, Primitive Methodist, Wesleyan Methodist, and Wesleyan Methodist Association.

Parishes adjacent to Ellesmere

  • Loppington
  • Whittington
  • Baschurch
  • Welshampton
  • Wem
  • Dudleston
  • Hordley
  • Petton
  • St Martin’s
  • Cockshutt
  • Penley
  • Halghton
  • Bettisfield
  • Great Ness

Historical Descriptions

Ellesmere

The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

ELLESMERE, a town, a sub-district, and a division in Salop; and a parish and a district, partly also in Flint. The town stands on Ellesmere lake, the Ellesmere canal, and the Cambrian railway, at the junction of the E. and Glyn Valley railway, 16 miles NNW of Shrewsbury. It took its name from the lake, which covers about 186 acres, and was known to the Saxons as Aelsmere, or “the great lake.” It belonged, at Domesday, to Earl Roger de Montgomery; it afterwards was held by the Crown, was frequently given, as a marriage portion with female members of the royal family, to the princes of Wales, but was given, in every instance under reservation of a right of resumption; it possessed, in those times, a strong castle which, as well as its situation on the frontier, made it a place of much importance in politics and in war; and it afterwards passed to successively Lord Strange, the Earls of Derby, Richard Spencer, Edward Savage, and the Egertons. Its castle occupied an eminence; was under special governors during all the times of its being held by the Crown; but began to pass into neglect from the time of Edward III.; was afterwards suffered to go to ruin; and has entirely disappeared. The castle’s site has been converted into a bowling-green; and commands a brilliant view over portions of nine counties. The town presents a pretty appearance; is a seat of petty sessions and a polling place; and has a post office under Shrewsbury, a railway station, three chief inns, two banking offices, a town-hall, a church, four dissenting chapels, a fine cemetery of 1865, a workhouse, and charities £115. The church is cruciform and decorated English; was rebuilt in 1849; has a good E window; and contains some ancient monuments. A weekly market is held on Tuesday; and fairs on the first Monday of every month. There is an extensive foundry at the wharf. There are also gas-works. A large trade is carried on in agricultural produce, and in malting. The Ellesmere and Glyn Valley railway was authorised in 1866; and goes, 15 miles, to Llansaintffraid-Glyn-Cerriog. The town gives the title of Earl to the Egertons. Pop., 2, 114. Houses, 413. The parish includes the townships of Ellesmere, Colemere, Crickett, Criftins, Eastwick, Elson-with-Greenhill, Birch and Lythe, Cockshutt and Crosemere, Frankton, Hamptons-Wood, Hardwick, Kenwicks-with-Stockett and Whettall, Kenwicks-Park, Kenwicks-Wood, Lee, Lyneal, New Marton, Newnes, Northwood, Oteley-with-Newton and Spoonhill, Ridges, Stocks-with-Coptivinney, Tetchill-with-French, and the chapelry of Dudleston, in Salop, and the chapelry of Penley in Flint. Acres, in Salop, 24,597; in Flint, 2,036. Real property, in Salop, £23,334; in Flint, £2,950. Pop., in Salop, 6,071; in Flint, 382. Houses, 1,229 and 91. The property is subdivided. Ellesmere House, a handsome brick-edifice, is the seat of Capt. Cust. Otley Park, a modern Tudor mansion, is the seat of Mainwaring, Esq.; and Lythe Hall is the seat of R. J. Jebb, Esq. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Lichfield. Value, £386. Patron, Earl Brownlow. The p. curacies of Cockshutt, Dudleston, and Penley are separate benefices.

The sub-district contains all the Salop parts of Ellesmere parish, and the parishes of Hordley and Welsh-Hampton. Acres, 28,646. Pop., 6,078. Houses, 1,400. The district comprehends also the sub-district of Baschurch, containing the parishes of Baschurch, Great Ness, Petton, and Middle; the sub-district of Hanmer, conterminate with Hanmer parish, electorally in Flint; and the sub-district of Overton, containing the parish of Overton, and the chapelry of Penley, both electorally in Flint. Acres, 71,081. Poor-rates in 1862, £6,665. Pop. in 1851, 15,239; in 1861, 14,611. Houses, 3,003. Marriages in 1860, 76; births, 407, of which 41 were illegitimate, deaths, 299, of which 74 were at ages under 5 years, and 7 at ages above 85. Marriages in the ten years 1851 60,752; births, 4,352; deaths, 2,894. The places of worship in 1851 were 17 of the Church of England, with 6,051 sittings; 8 of Independents, with 1,220 s.; 1 of Baptists, with 90 s.; 7 of Wesleyan Methodists, with 815 s.; 25 of Primitive Methodists, with 2,100 s.; and 2 of the Wesleyan Association, with 264 s. The schools were 17 public day schools, with 1,265 scholars; 28 private day schools, with 682 s.; 27 Sunday schools, with 1,553 s.; and 1 evening school for adults, with 14 s. The division is part of Pimhill hundred, and contains three parishes and parts of two others. Acres, 35,555. Pop., 8,227. Houses, 1,622.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Ellesmere. A market town, in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill, a vicarage remaining in charge, in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield, the deanery of Salop, and archdeaconry of Salop. 1,143 houses, 6,056 inhabitants. 17 miles north north-west of Shrewsbury. 176 miles north-west of London. LAT. 52.56. N. LONG. 2, 59 W.

Ellesmere takes its name from a mere, or great lake in its neighbourhood. It is a town of Saxon origin, and was formerly called Aelsmere, or the greatest mere; the lake that washes it being of the extent of 101 acres (some say 116 acres). Ael in composition signifies excellence, or fullness; and mere, a lake resembling as it were a little sea. Though some derive the name from the abundance of eels in that water.

By statute the twenty seventh of Henry the eighth, Ellesmere cum membris was united to the hundred of Pimhill. In the fortieth year of Elizabeth, the Queen gave license to Sir Edward Kynaston, Knight, to keep a market, on Tuesday, and a fair. But the account given by Leland, of this town, is, that it had four streets, and no market. None of the ruins of the castle are left; (lt was destroyed in the seventeenth century, during the rage of the civil war) but the eminence on which the keep stood, discovers that it has been an ancient fort.

Ellesmere is an elegant little town, and is rendered exceeding beautiful by the fine wood fringed lake, which comes close to its walls. It has a good market, and the chief trade of the town is in malting and tanning.

On the castle hill (formerly the keep) there is one of the finest bowling greens in the kingdom, from which there is an extensive prospect of nine different counties.

The church of Ellesmere is a spacious, but irregular, cruciform building. In the centre is a handsome square tower, adorned with pinnacles. The tracery of the great eastern Window is highly beautiful. In a chapel, south of the chancel, is an ancient tomb of the Kynaston’s of Hordley. The ceiling of this part is highly adorned with Gothick fretwork.

Market on Tuesday. Fairs, February 2, the third Tuesday in April, Whit Tuesday, August 26, and November 14. The second is a great fair for barren cows.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Astley, Newton, and Spoonhill

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Astley, Newton, and Spoonhill. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Birch and Lyth

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Birch and Lyth. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the hundred of Pimhill. 1 mile south of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Cockshut and Crosemere

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Cockshut, and Crosemere. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. Cockshut is chapel to Ellesmere, and is in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield, the deanery of Salop, and archdeaconry of Salop. Cockshut is 4 miles, and Crosemere 3 miles, south-east of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Coolmere

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Coolmere. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the hundred of Pimhill. 2 miles east of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Cricket

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Cricket. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 2 ½ miles west of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Eastwick

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Eastwick. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Elson or Elston Gregory

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Elson; or Elston. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 1 ½ mile north-west of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

English Frankton

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Frankton (English). A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 5 miles south-east of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Hardwick

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Hardwick. A township in the parish of Ellesmere and in the Ellesmere division of the hunched of Pimhill. The seat of the Rev. Sir Edward Kynaston, bart. 1 ½ mile south-west of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Kenwick

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Kenwick. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Kenwick Park

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Kenwick Park. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 3 miles south of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Kenwick Wood

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Kenwick Wood. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 4 miles south of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Lee

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Lee. A township in the hundred of Pimhill.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Lineal or Linial or Lyneal

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Lineal or Linial or Lyneal. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 3 miles south-east of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

New Marton

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

New Marton. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 4 miles west of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Newnes

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Newnes. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 1 mile south-west of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Newton Oatley and Spoonhill

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Newton Oatley and Spoonhill. A township in the parish of Ellesmere, and in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill. 1 ½ mile east of Ellesmere.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Parish Registers

The Register of the Independent Chapel, Ellesmere 1787-1811

Shropshire parish registers : Nonconformist and Roman Catholic registers (1903)

Author: Shropshire Parish Register Society; Evans, George Eyre; Fletcher, W. G. D. (William George Dimock), 1851-1935; Kinsella, William

Publisher: [London] : Privately printed for the Shropshire Parish Register Society.

The Register of the Independent Chapel, Ellesmere 1787-1811 – Archive.org

Directories

Ellesmere Universal British Directory 1791

Photographs

Administration

  • County: Shropshire
  • Civil Registration District: Ellesmere
  • Probate Court: Court of the Peculiar of the Manor of Ellesmere
  • Diocese: Lichfield
  • Rural Deanery: Ellesmere
  • Poor Law Union: Ellesmere
  • Hundred: Pimhill
  • Province: Canterbury
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