Clun, Shropshire Family History Guide

The Church, Clun.
The Church, Clun.

Clun is an Ancient Parish in the county of Shropshire.

Other places in the parish include: Bicton, Whitcott Keysett and Newcastle, Burfield, Chapel Lawn, Eddicliff, Ediclift, Ediclift with Whitcott Keyset and Shadwell, Guilden Down, Hobarris, Hobthorin, Hodre, Hopebarras, Hopebendrid, Hopebendrid with Menutton, Perlogue and Obarris, Kevencalonog, Manutton, Menupton, Menutton, Obarras, Obarris, Perlogne, Perlogue, Shadwell, Spoad, Treverward, Treverward with Menutton, Perlogue and Obarris, Upper Treverward, Weston, Whitcott Evan, Whitcott Keyset, Whitcott Keysett, and Bicton with Whitcott Keyset and Shadwell.

Parish church:

Parish registers begin: 1653

Nonconformists include: Baptist, Primitive Methodist, and Wesleyan Methodist.

Parishes adjacent to Clun

  • Stowe
  • Clunbury with Clunton
  • Newcastle
  • Lydbury North
  • Mainstone
  • Hopton Castle
  • Llanfair Waterdine
  • Bucknell and Buckton
  • Bishop’s Castle

Historical Descriptions

Clun Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Clun, a river, a small town, a parish, a sub-district, a district, and a hundred in Salop. The river rises near the boundary with Wales; and runs 11 miles eastward, and 7 southward, to the Teme, near Leintwardine. The town stands on the river, 3 miles W of Offa’s dyke, 5 ½ SSW of Bishops-Castle, and 6 ½ N by E of Knighton r. station; is a polling-place, and a nominal borough, governed by a bailiff and 30 burgesses, under Earl Powis, gives the title of Baron to the Duke of Norfolk; and has a head post-office, a hotel, a town-hall, a five-arched bridge, a ruined ancient castle, a parish church, two dissenting chapels, and a hospital for poor men, under a master or warden. The castle was built, in the time of Henry III, by the Fitzalans; and destroyed by Owen Glendower. The town-hall is a modern structure on arches. The church is partly Norman; and has a font and monuments. The hospital was founded, in 1614, by Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton; is a plain quadrangular edifice, with a chapel; and has an endowed income of £1,530. A weekly market is held on Wednesday; and fairs on Whit-Monday and Nov. 22. – The parish comprises also the division of Ediclift or Bicton, containing the townships of Ediclift, Bicton, Whitcott-Keyset, and Shadwell; the division of Newcastle, containing the townships of Newcastle, Spoad, Whitcot-Evan, and part of Kevencalonog; and the division of Hopebendrid or Treverward, containing the townships of Hopebendrid, Treverward, Menutton, Perlogne, and Obarris. Acres, 19,782. Rated property, £14,070. Pop., 2,338. Houses, 482. The property is much subdivided. The manor belonged early to the Fitzalans; went, in the time of Elizabeth, to the Dukes of Norfolk; and passed to the Walcots and the Earls of Powis. There are several ancient British and Roman remains, particularly at Offa’s dyke, the Bury ditches, and Caer-Caradoc. The living is a vicarage, united with the p. curacy of Chapel-Lawn, in the diocese of Hereford. Value, £680. Patron, the Earl of Powis. The p. curacy of Newcastle is a separate benefice. – The sub-district contains the parishes of Clun, Clungunford, Clunbury, and Hopton-Castle. Acres, 31,358. Pop., 4,152. Houses, 836. The district comprehends also the sub-district of Norbury, containing the parishes of Norbury, More, Ratlinghope, Wentnor, and Mindtown; the sub-districts North Lydbury, containing the parishes of North Lydbury, Edgton, and Hopesay, and the extra-parochial tracts of Horderly Hall, Hill-end, Old-Church-moor, and Dinmore; and the sub-district of Bishops-Castle, containing the town and liberties of Bishops-Castle, the parishes of Shelve, Hyssington, and Snead – the last wholly, the next partly, in Montgomery – and the greater of the parishes of Mainstone and Lydham. Acres, 82,886. Poor-rates in 1862, £6,466. Pop. in 1841, 10,022; in 1861, 10,615. Houses, 2,120. Marriages in 1860, 82; births, 338, – of which 32 were illegitimate; deaths, 194, – of which 63 were at ages under 5 years, and 11 at ages above 85. Marriages in the ten years 1851-60,667; births, 3,235; deaths, 1,911. The places of worship in 1851 were 19 of the Church of England, with 4,080 sittings; 3 of Independents, with 288 s.; 2 of Baptists, with 90 s.; 3 of Wesleyan Methodists, with 150 s.; 21 of Primitive Methodists, with 1,056 s.; and 1 of Roman Catholics, with 40 s. The schools were 12 public day schools, with 576 scholars; 8 private day schools, with 153 s.; and 7 Sunday schools, with 428 s. The workhouse is in Bishops-Castle. – The hundred consists of two divisions, Clun and Mainstone; the former conterminate with Clun parish, the latter containing three parishes and part of another. Acres of the Mainstone division, 21,315. Pop., 3,869. Houses, 773.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Clun Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Clun. A parish in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun, a vicarage, in the diocese of Hereford, the deanery of Clun, and archdeaconry of Salop. 324 houses, 2,781 inhabitants. 5 miles south-west by south of Bishopscastle. It derives its name from its river Colun, or Clun. It is an insignificant and neglected town, and possesses little worthy of observation, except its castle, which has long been a ruin. It was erected in the reign of Henry the third, by William Fitz-alan, to one of whose ancestors the manor had devolved by marriage to the family of Say. John, the son of William, was captain-general of the forces, commanding the Welsh marshes, and this castle was, in those turbulent times, a stronghold for warriors, and a receptacle of their plunder. It remained in his line, down to the reign of Queen Elizabeth, when the last earl died. By the marriage of Mary Fitz-alan, with Philip Howard, the son of Thomas Duke of Norfolk, it became vested in that noble family. From thence it passed to the Walcotts, and afterwards by purchase to Lord Clive, in whose family it continues. The Duke of Norfolk still retains the title of Baron of Clun. Fairs, Whitsunday, and Nov. 22; the last is a great fair for sheep. See appendix.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Clun Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Q. Describe Clun.

A. Clun is a small decayed town, or rather village, five miles from Bishop’s Castle, deriving its name from the neighbouring river. It is remarkable merely for the ruins of its castle, once an extensive and strong fortress, erected by William Fitz-Alan, in the reign of Henry III. Clun gives the title of baron to the Duke of Norfolk.

Q. What is remarkable in the vicinity of Clun ?

A. A little to the north-east of Clun is Walcot Park, the noble seat of Earl Powis *. The mansion, which is of brick, with stone corners, and a Doric portico, stands on a gently rising eminence. The approach to it is embellished by lofty trees, and a fine expanse of water. The park is very extensive, and the disposition of its various ornaments evinces the fine taste of its noble proprietor.

Q. What remains of antiquity are within the boundary of this domain ?

A. On an eminence near the road, called Tongley, are the vestiges of a British encampment, of a circular form, called the Bury Ditches. The area of the camp is defended by three deep trenches, with high mounds and ramparts.

* Robert Clive, the founder of this noble family, was the son of a gentleman of small estate, who practised the law. He was born September 29, 1725, and at a proper age went to Madras, as a writer in the East India Company’s service. Preferring however the sword to the pen, he in 1747, obtained an ensigncy, and, by his talents and bravery, rose by degrees to be governor-general of Fort William, and commander-in-chief of the king’s and company’s forces in Bengal. At this time the affairs of the company were almost desperate; they possessed no territory, one of their factories was in ruins, and a powerful army preparing to drive them from their principal settlement. By the courage and conduct of Clive, however, things soon wore a different aspect, and in the space of ten years these humble merchants became powerful princes, possessed of large revenues, and ruling over fifteen millions of subjects. For these, and other important services, Mr. Clive was made a peer in 1762, by the title of Lord Clive, of Plassey, in Ireland. His exertions in the burning climate of India, injured his constitution, and soon after his return to England he laboured under a depression of spirits, and died Nov. 22, 1774, in the fiftieth year of his age. His son Edward, second Lord Clive; was born March 7, 1754, and in 1794 was made an English peer, by the title of Lord Clive, of Walcot. In consequence of his marriage with the sister and heiress of Earl Powis, he was on the death of that nobleman created Viscount Clive and Earl Powis. The family motto is—Audaciter et sinceré — Boldly and ingenuously.

Source: The History and Topography of Shropshire; William Pinnock Jolibois; 1820.

Bickton

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Bickton. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun. 6 miles south-west by south of Bishopscastle.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Burfield

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Burfield. An extra-parochial place near Clun.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Clunton

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Clunton. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Stow division of the hundred of Purslow. 4 ½ miles south of Bishopscastle.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Clungonas

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Clungonas. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Stow division of the hundred of Purslow.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824.

Clunbury and Brompton

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Clunbury and Brompton. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Stow division of the hundred of Purslow. Clunbury is a curacy not in charge, in the diocese of Hereford, the deanery of Clun, and archdeaconry of Salop.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Eddicliff

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Eddicliff. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun. 61 houses, 419 inhabitants.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Hebbaris or Hobbaris

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Hebbaris or Hobbaris. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun. 7 miles south-west by south of Bishopscastle.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Hobendrid

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Hobendrid, a township in Clun parish, county of Salop; 4 miles north-north-east of Knighton. Houses 52. Pop., in 1821, 255; in 1831, 285. Other returns with the parish.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

Gregory Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Hobendred. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun. 47 houses, 255 inhabitants.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Newcastle

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Newcastle. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun. 37 houses, 315 inhabitants. 6 ½ miles south-west of Bishopscastle.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Perlogue

Shropshire Gazetteer 1824

Perlogue. A township in the parish of Clun, and in the Clun division of the hundred of Clun. 8 miles south-west of Bishopscastle.

Source: The Shropshire Gazetteer, with an Appendix, including a Survey of the County and Valuable Miscellaneous Information, with Plates. Printed and Published by T. Gregory, Wem, 1824

Shadwell

Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Shadwell, a township in Clun parish, Salop; 4 ¼ miles SW of Bishops-Castle. Pop., 59.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Poll Books

Clun Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Directories

Clun Aubrey Shropshire Directory 1925

Photographs

Administration

  • County: Shropshire
  • Civil Registration District: Clun
  • Probate Court: Court of the Bishop of Hereford (Episcopal Consistory)
  • Diocese: Hereford
  • Rural Deanery: Clun
  • Poor Law Union: Clun
  • Hundred: Clun
  • Province: Canterbury
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