Aston juxta Birmingham Warwickshire Family History Guide

Aston juxta Birmingham is an Ancient Parish in the county of Warwickshire. Erdington and Castle Bromwich are chapelries of Aston juxta Birmingham.

Other places in the parish include: Ashted, Duddeston-cum-Nechells, Deritend, Witton, Saltley with Washwood, Water Orton, and Little Bromwich.

Parish church:

Parish registers begin: 1544

Separate registers exist for:

  • Ashted: 1810
  • Water Orton: 1813

Nonconformists include: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, General Baptist New Connexion, Independent/Congregational, Irvingite/Catholic Apostolic Church, Particular Baptist, Presbyterian, Primitive Methodist, Roman Catholic, Wesleyan Methodist, and Wesleyan Methodist Reform.

Parishes adjacent to Aston juxta Birmingham

Historical Descriptions

Aston

Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Aston, 2 m. N. Birmingham. P. 45,718

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

Aston, a parish in the Birmingham division of the hund. of Hemlingford, union of Aston, Warwickshire; 2¼ miles north-east by east from Birmingham, and 95¼ by railway from Liverpool. It contains the townships of Aston, Bordesley, Castle-Bromwich, Deritend, Duddlestone with Nechells, Erdington, Saltley-Washwood with Little Bromwich, Water-Orton, and Witton. Living, a vicarage, to which are annexed the chapelries of Deritend, Bordesley, and Erdington, formerly in the archd. of Coventry and dio. of Lichfield and Coventry, now in the dio. of Worcester; rated at £21 4s. 9½d.; average gross income £2,062. Patrons, in 1835, the trustees of the late Rev. G. Peake. The great tithes, the property of the lay-impropriator, commuted in 1802. There are two chapels in this parish erected by the parliamentary commissioners, viz. at Bordesley and at Erdington. The former cost £13,091; the latter £4,200. Both are in the Gothic style. The Baptists, Methodists, Independents, and various bodies of dissenters, have chapels in this parish. There were in 1833, 2 infant schools, 26 daily schools, 11 day and boarding schools, 3 day and Sunday schools, and 11 Sunday schools in this parish. Here is an alms-house for ten poor persons, founded in 1650 by Sir Thomas Holte. Its annual revenue is £88. There is also a bequest of Dame Anne Holte, in 1735, of £20 per annum, for behoof of the alms people. Other charities connected with the parish produce about £64 per annum. The Aston poor-law union comprehends five parishes, containing 47 square miles, with a population, returned in 1831, at 36,635. The average yearly expenditure on the poor of this district, during the three years preceding the formation of the union, was £8,813. Expenditure in 1838, £6,042. The inhabitants are for the most part artizans, employed in the various branches of manufacture for which Birmingham is celebrated. In 1838 there was a cotton and silk mill employing 32 hands, in this parish. The Birmingham and Fazeley canal passes through this parish; and the Grand Junction railway here crosses this canal by a viaduct of 10 arches. The parish is intersected by the line of the proposed railway from Castle-Bromwich to Kingsbury. Aston hall, a fine old mansion in this parish, is now the property of James Watt, Esq., son of the inventor of the steam-engine. Pop., in 1801, 11,693; in 1831, 32,118. Houses 6,409. The population of this parish has increased by 12,929 persons since the census of 1821, — a circumstance which is attributable to its connection with the manufactures of Birmingham. Acres 13,330. A. P. £53,142. Poor rates, in 1837, £7,961.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1840.

Ashted

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

Ashted St. James, a chapelry in the parish of Aston-juxta-Birmingham, Warwickshire. Living, a perpetual curacy, formerly in the archd. of Coventry and dio. of Lichfield and Coventry, now in the dio. of Worcester; gross income £210. Patrons, in 1835, the bishop of Lichfield and others, as trustees. Pop., in 1831, 12,698

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1840.

St. James’ Chapel, Great Brook Street

St. James’s Chapel, Great Brook Street, Ashted, at the eastern extremity of Birmingham, is a substantial plain brick building, originally the private residence of the late Dr. Ash. the founder of the General Hospital, Birmingham. On his decease, it was converted into a Proprietary Chapel, by Dr. Crofts, and very neatly fitted up as a place of worship. On his decease, it was put up for sale by public auction, and was purchased by some friends of the late Rev. Edward Burn, incumbent of St, Mary’s, at a cost of £1,200. repaired and re-fitted at an additional expense of £1,500, and consecrated by Bishop Cornwallis, September 7th, 1810, and vested in the hands of the Rev. Henry Ryder and three others, as trustees for sixty years, and the Rev. Henry Burn nominated as minister. In 1829, Mr. Burn resigned the care of the chapel, when the Rev. Josiah Allport, its present incumbent, was appointed. In 1830, the chapel was thoroughly repaired, and the galleries extended so as to provide 150 free sittings, at an expense of £848, previous to which, in this hamlet, containing nearly 12,000 souls, there was no accommodation for the poor. In 1835, the population around being more than doubled, the chapel was enlarged, at a cost of about £1,300, by the addition of at least one-third of its present length, forming it into a proper oblong; besides the construction of a suitable chancel, and the galleries extended throughout the new part. The chapel will now seat 1,500 persons, of which 600 are free seats, besides 250 sittings for the Sunday school children. A sweet-toned organ, built by Bishop, was, during the time of the Rev. Mr. Burn, placed in the chapel; and very recently, John Whittingham, Esq. bequeathed £200. for the erection of a clock in the turret, but which is wholly unsuited to such an advantageous appendage. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of trustees, as before stated, but has no endownent attached to it: the support of the minister, and defraying of all repairs and incidental expenses, rests solely on the seatholders. The present incumbent has four public services every Lord’s day: commencing at nine o’clock in the morning, for the convenience of the military, in the barracks contigious to St. James’s; with congregational services at eleven, afternoon at three; and evening at half-past six.

Source: History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire; Francis White & Co.; 1850.

Deritend

Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Deritend, a chapelry and a sub-district, in the parish and district of Aston, Warwick. The chapelry lies on the river Rea, the Birmingham and Warwick canal, and the Birmingham and Oxford railway, within Birmingham borough; comprises some of the south-eastern streets of Birmingham; and has a post-office under Birmingham. Pop. not separately returned. The living is a p. curacy in the diocese of Worcester. Value, £319. Patrons, the Inhabitants. The church was rebuilt in 1735; and has a square brick tower, added in 1762. There are chapels for Independents, Baptists, and Wesleyans.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Deritend, 1 mile S.E. Birmingham. P. included in Aston

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Duddeston-cum-Nechells

St. Matthew’s Church, Gt. Lister Street

St. Matthew’s Church, Gt. Lister Street, Duddeston-cum-Nechells, Aston parish, is a handsome brick structure, in the Gothic style, with lancet windows, a tower and spire, and was built by the Birmingham Church Building Society, formed in 1838-9 to build ten churches, at a cost of £3,200, and consecrated October 20th, 1840. It has a district of about 11,000 souls assigned to it. The living, a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of trustees. Rev. George W. Chamberlain, M.A., incumbent.

The Parsonage, a neat residence, is near the church.

Source: History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire; Francis White & Co.; 1850.

Gravelly Hill

Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Gravelly Hill, a place in Aston parish, Warwick; on the Birmingham and Sutton-Coldfield railway, 2 ½ miles NE by N of Birmingham. It has a station on the railway, and a post-office under Birmingham.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Little Bromwich

A Topographical Dictionary of England 1845

Bromwich, Little, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Aston, Birmingham division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 3 miles (N. E.) from Birmingham; containing 262 inhabitants. The hamlet is bounded by the river Tame on the north, and by the river Cole on the south, and is intersected by the road between Birmingham and Coleshill, and the London and Birmingham railway: the surface is flat and well-wooded, and the soil is a sandy loam. Ward-End Hall, an old farm-house near the church of Ward-End (which see), with about 100 acres of land, comprising the 30 acres mentioned in Dugdale’s Warwickshire as the Park, is the property of Thos. Hutton, Esq., and is occupied by a member of his family. The manor-house at Allum Rock is the property of W. Webb Essington, Esq., and the residence of Isaac Marshall, Esq.; and Ward-End House is the property and residence of George Marshall, Esq.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis Fifth Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.

Saltley with Washwood

Lewis Topographical Dictionary of England 1845

Saltley, with Washwood, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Aston, Birmingham division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N division of the county of Warwick; containing 695 inhabitants.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis Fifth Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.

Water Orton

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Water-Overton, or Orton, a chapelry in the parish and union of Aston, Birmingham division of the hund. of Hemlingford, county of Warwick; 2½ miles north-west of Coleshill, near the Birmingham and Derby railway. Living, a perpetual curacy, formerly in the archd. of Coventry, and dio. of Lichfield and Coventry, now in the dio. of Worcester; not in charge, returned at £75; gross income £115; subordinate to the vicarage of Aston. Patrons, in 1841, certain trustees. Returns with the parish.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

Directories

Aston Gazetteer and Directory of Warwickshire 1850

Ward End and Little Bromwich Trades Directory 1861

Ward End and Little Bromwich Warwickshire Directory 1850

Saltley and Washwood Warwickshire Directory 1850

Water Orton Trades Directory 1861

Water Orton Warwickshire Directory 1850

Witton Trades Directory 1861

Witton Warwickshire Directory 1850

Bankrupts

Below is a list of people that were declared bankrupt between 1820 and 1843 extracted from The Bankrupt Directory; George Elwick; London; Simpkin, Marshall and Co.; 1843.

Battcock Charles, Victoria tavern, Aston, Birmingham, victualler, Mar. 30, 1841.

Battin John and James, Aston, near Birmingham, corn dealer, Jan. 13, 1832.

Bedson Thomas; and Robert Bishop; Aston, Birmingham, brass founders, June 22, 1822.

Benson Edward White; and William Darke; Aston, Birmingham, chemists, Nov. 17, 1829.

Bishop Robert, Aston road, near Birmingham, brass founder, June 8, 1822.

Brentnall Benjamin, Aston, near Birmingham, miller, June 16, 1829.

Burt Edward, Aston juxta Birmingham, victualler, Jan. 14, 1840.

 

Administration

  • County: Warwickshire
  • Civil Registration District: Aston
  • Probate Court: Post-1836 – Court of the Bishop of Worcester (Episcopal Consistory), Pre-1837 – Court of the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry (Episcopal Consistory)
  • Diocese: Worcester
  • Rural Deanery: Arden
  • Poor Law Union: Aston
  • Hundred: Birmingham Borough; Hemlingford
  • Province: Canterbury
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