Wandsworth Surrey Family History Guide

Wandsworth consists of the following parishes:

  • Wandsworth All Saints, Surrey
  • Wandsworth St Anne, Surrey

Historical Descriptions

The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

WANDSWORTH, a town, a parish, and a district, in Surrey. The town stands on the river Wandle at its influx to the Thames, on the London and Windsor railway, near the point of the Southwestern railway whence the branch goes off to Croydon, and 6 miles SW of St. Paul’s, London; is mentioned in Domesday book; became a seat of several important manufactures introduced by French refugees and by Dutchmen, after the revocation of the edict of Nantes; is a seat of petty sessions and county-courts; carries on industry in oil-mills, dye-works, calico-printing-works, hat-making establishments, extensive paper-mills, corn mills, vinegar-works, distilleries, and a brewery; conducts inland commerce from the mouth of the Wandle; occupies the declivities of two hills; includes a suburb on the E called New Wandsworth; contains many handsome houses; and has a post-office under London SW, two r. stations, two chief inns, a recently-erected court-house, a police station, the Surrey house of correction, the Surrey lunatic asylum, the Bridge-House reformatory, the Royal Victoria Patriotic asylum, three churches, seven dissenting chapels, a Roman Catholic chapel, a literary and scientific institution, a collegiate school, five national schools, a British school, a green-coat school with £67 a year from endowment. the industrial school of St. James, Westminster, the Fishmongers’ alms houses, the Hibbert alms houses, and other charities £321. The house of correction has capacity for 742 male and 244 female prisoners. The lunatic asylum was built in 1842, at a cost of more than £150,000; is in the Tudor style, 535 feet long, with centre and wings; and has accommodation for upwards of 1,000 patients. The Patriotic asylum was founded in 1857 by the Queen; was built and endowed from a surplus of the patriotic fund, formed during the Crimean war in 1854-5; presents a general resemblance to Heriot’s hospital, in Edinburgh; and serves for 300 orphan daughters of soldiers, sailors, and marines. All Saints church, excepting the tower, was rebuilt in 1780. St. Anne’s church was built in 1824, at a cost of £14,600; and is in the Ionic style. Trinity church is recent and spacious. A Baptist chapel, built in 1863, is in the Romanesque style. The Fishmongers’ alms houses were built in 1849-51, at a cost of £25,000; are in the Tudor style; form a quadrangle 255 feet by 235; and have a handsome chapel in the centre.

The parish includes Garrett and Summer-Town; is ecclesiastically cut into three sections; and comprises 2,432 acres of land, and 46 of water. Real property, £73,414; of which £1,607 are in gasworks. Pop. in 1851, 9,611; in 1861, 13,346. Houses, 1,909. The livings of All Saints and St. Anne are vicarages, the former with Trinity chapel annexed, in the diocese of Winchester. Value of A. S., £350; of St. A., £800. Patron of A. S., the Rev. J. Buckmaster; of St. A., Miss Du Buisson. The p. curacy of Summer-Town is a separate benefice.—The district contains also Clapham, Putney, Lower Tooting, Streatham, and Battersea parishes, except Penge hamlet. Acres of the district. 11,695. Poor rates in 1863, £44,571. Pop. in 1851, 50,764; in 1861, 70,403. Houses, 11,186. Marriages in 1863, 504; births, 2,579,-of which 105 were illegitimate; deaths, 1,498,-of which 613 were at ages under 5 years, and 21 at ages above 85. Marriages in the ten years 1851-60, 3,528; births, 18,205; deaths, 12,376. The places of worship, in 1851, were 21 of the Church of England, with 17,461 sittings; 7 of Independents, with 3,200 s.; 6 of Baptists, with 1,920 s.; 1 of Quakers, with 180 s.; 7 of Wesleyans, with 1,366 s.; 1 undefined, with 100 s.; 1 of Latter Day Saints, with 100 s.; and 2 of Roman Catholics, with 382 s. The schools were 40 public day-schools, with 5,061 scholars; 140 private day-schools, with 2,968 s.; 44 Sunday schools, with 4,211 s.; and 6 evening schools for adults, with 88 s. The workhouse is in Battersea.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Wandsworth, 5 miles S.W. London. P.7614

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Bankrupts

Below is a list of people that were declared bankrupt between 1820 and 1843 extracted from The Bankrupt Directory; George Elwick; London; Simpkin, Marshall and Co.; 1843.

Aldridge John, Wandsworth, Surrey, calico printer, April 1, 1828.

Maps

Wandsworth & SW Battersea 1913: London Sheet 114.3 (Old Ordnance Survey Maps of London) Map – Folded Map, 3 Nov 2015. Features on the map include the southern part of Clapham Junction station, Wandsworth station, brewery, mill and canal near the River Wandle, Royal Paper Mills, part of Wandsworth Common, Royal Victoria Patriotic Asylum, St Peter’s Hospital, New Wandsworth goods station, Wandsworth & Clapham Union Infirmary, tramways, St Mary’s Cemetery. Churches include St Anne’s, St Paul’s, St Mark’s Battersea Rise. Streets include Bolingbroke Grove, part of Lavender Hill, St John’s Hill, East Hill, North Street, South Street and many more.

Putney & NW Wandsworth 1894: London Sheet 113.2 (Old Ordnance Survey Maps of London) Map – Folded Map, 13 Jul 2015 by Pamela Taylor (Author). Publisher: Alan Godfrey Maps (13 July 2015). Coverage stretching from Larpent Avenue and Colinette Road eastward to Budlow Road and Broomhill Road in Wandsworth; and from Cardinal Place and the High Street southward to Melrose Road and Seymour Road. They therefore cover much of central Putney, including Putney station, and the area south and east, to include the West Hill area, and also part of Wandsworth High St.

Wandsworth Common 1893: London Sheet 124 (Old O.S. Maps of London) Paperback – Folded Map, Facsimile by Tony Shaw (Author). Publisher: Alan Godfrey Maps; Facsimile of 1893 ed edition (1 Sept. 1992). Detailed map of Wandsworth Common; London sheet 124. The map covers an area south of Wandsworth, from Wandsworth Prison southward to Garratt Green, and from Earlsfield eastward to St James’s Road. Features include Earlsfield and Wandsworth Common stations, much of Wandsworth Common, Garratt Mills, a stretch of the River Wandle, Duntshill Mills, Wandsworth & Clapham Workhouse, Wandsworth Cemetery, Middlesex Lunatic Asylum (originally Surrey Pauper Asylum), St James Westminster Industrial School, Riversdale Fireworks Works, Holy Trinity church. On the reverse are street directories for Bellevue Road, Bendon Valley, Garratt Lane, Trinity Road, Wandle Road.

Wandsworth 1894: London Sheet 114 (Old O.S. Maps of London) Map – Facsimile, Folded Map by R. J. Ensing (Author). Publisher: Alan Godfrey Maps; Facsimile of 1894 ed edition (Feb. 1990). Detailed map of Wandsworth; London sheet 114 Introduction by Rita Ensing The map covers an area of a mile by a mile and a half, running from Red Lion Street and the River Wandle eastward to Leathwaite Road; from St John’s Hill and Clapham Junction station southward to Dorlcote Road. Features on the map include the southern part of Clapham Junction station, Wandsworth station, brewery, mill and canal near the River Wandle, Royal Paper Mills, part of Wandsworth Common, Royal Victoria Patriotic Asylum, St Peter’s Hospital, New Wandsworth goods station, Wandsworth & Clapham Union Infirmary, tramways, St Mary’s Cemetery. Churches include St Anne’s, St Paul’s, St Mark’s Battersea Rise. Streets include Bolingbroke Grove, part of Lavender Hill, St John’s Hill, East Hill, North Street, South Street and many more. There are street directories extracts.

Wandsworth Common 1868: London Sheet 124.1 (Old Ordnance Survey Maps of London) Map – Folded Map, 23 Mar 2015 by Pamela Taylor (Author). The map covers an area south of Wandsworth, from Wandsworth Prison southward to Garratt Green, and from Earlsfield eastward to St James’s Road. Features (on the 1893 version) include Earlsfield and Wandsworth Common stations, much of Wandsworth Common, Garratt Mills, a stretch of the River Wandle, Duntshill Mills, Wandsworth & Clapham Workhouse, Wandsworth Cemetery, Middlesex Lunatic Asylum (originally Surrey Pauper Asylum), St James Westminster Industrial School, Riversdale Fireworks Works, Holy Trinity church.

Cassini Historical Map, London 1919-1922 (LON-POP): Discover the Landscape of London’s Past (Cassini London Historical Map) Map – 2011 by Cassini Publishing Ltd (Author). London Popular Edition. Created from four Ordnance Survey Popular Edition maps first published in 1920 re-projected to match Ordnance Survey Landranger®

Books

The Registers of the Parish of Wandsworth in the County of Surrey. (1603-1787) Paperback – 5 Feb 2018 by Eng Wandsworth (Author), John Traviss Squire (Author).

Wandsworth (Archive Photographs) Paperback – 1 Dec 1994 by Patrick Loobey (Author). This book is part of the Images of London series, which uses old photographs and archived images to show the history of various local areas in England, through their streets, shops, pubs, and people.

The London Borough of Wandsworth (Britain in Old Photographs S.) Paperback – 8 Oct 1998 by Patrick Loobey (Author). This addition to the “Britain in Old Photographs” series brings together a collection of black-and-white pictures spanning the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Drawn from family albums, local collections and professional photographers, they show the way things were and how they have changed. Every photograph is captioned, providing names and dates where possible, revealing historical and anecdotal detail and giving life to the scenes and personalities captured through the camera lens. Bringing together all aspects of daily life – celebrations and disasters, work and leisure, people and buildings – the collection should inspire memories, as well as serve as an introduction to visitors.

Wandsworth Past Hardcover – 1 Oct 2007 by Dorian Gerhold (Author). This is the first general history of this large London parish, which, after Tudor popularity became a hive of industry. Many of the illustrations have not previously been published.

We served: War time Wandsworth and Battersea 1939-1945 Paperback – 1 Jan 1989 by Anthony Shaw (Author).

Wandsworth at War in Old Photographs (Britain in Old Photographs) Paperback – 13 Sep 1996 by Patrick Loobey (Author).

Wandsworth and Battersea Battalions in the Great War Hardcover – 18 Feb 2010 by Paul McCue (Author). In 1915 Lord Kitchener extended his famous “Your Country Needs You” recruitment campaign by appealing to the Mayors of the London Metropolitan Boroughs, urging each Mayor to raise a unit of local men for active service overseas.In south-west London, the response from two neighbouring boroughs, Wandsworth and Battersea, could not have been more different. In Wandsworth, Mayor Dawnay personally took up the challenge and soon recruited, for the East Surrey Regiment, double the number of men needed for an infantry battalion. In Battersea, however, there was initially no more than lukewarm interest, partly due to the local Territorial Force unit, the 23rd London Regiment, having expanded from one to three battalions thanks to thousands of earlier volunteers. But as Wandsworth’s efforts bore fruit, Battersea too pledged to raise a full infantry battalion. Mirroring the different political leanings of the two boroughs, Mayor Simmons pledged Battersea’s battalion to the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment. Wandsworth’s 13th East Surreys and Battersea’s 10th Queen’s both served with honour and distinction. But they, and the communities from which they came, also suffered thousands of men wounded and killed. This sacrifice cemented links with France, Belgium and Italy that continue today. From the early tragic death of an adventurous boy of just 15, to the heroic deeds of a dustman who won the Victoria Cross, this book describes the pain and the glory of the volunteers of Wandsworth and Battersea on the Western Front.Born in Yorkshire in 1958 , Paul McCue graduated from the University of Birmingham. His working life began with Laker Airways. He is currently a Director in an inner London local authority. Interests in local and military history led him to research and write Dunsfold, Surrey’s Most Secret Airfield (1992). This was followed by SAS Operation Bulbasket and Behind Enemy Lines with the SAS, both with Pen and Sword Paul McCue lives in Surrey.

Wandsworth Prison: A History Paperback – 1 Dec 2001 by Stewart McLaughlin (Author), Thomas Cox (Author), Stephen Rimmea (Author). Traces the history of the Wandsworth Prison.

Execution Suite: A History of the Gallows at Wandsworth Prison 1878-1993 Paperback – 1 Dec 2004 by Stewart McLaughlin (Author), Patrick Loobey (Foreword). “Execution Suite” is a title dealing with capital punishment with respect to British prisons.

Huguenots in Wandsworth Paperback – 1 Jan 1985 by R. A Shaw (Author)

Industries of Wandsworth Paperback – Facsimile, 1 Jan 1983 by C. T. Davis (Author), Derek A. Bayliss (Introduction)

The Way we were, 1870-1920: Scenes of the Borough of Wandsworth: a selection from the Wandsworth Libraries local history collection Paperback – 1 Jan 1980

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s