Pitton and Farley Wiltshire Family History Guide

Status: Chapelry

Parish church:

Parish registers begin:

  • Parish registers: 1661; see also Alderbury
  • Bishop’s Transcripts: 1605

Nonconformists include:

English: All Saints Church, Farley The classic...
English: All Saints Church, Farley The classical church of All Saints was built between 1689 and 1690 of country brick and influenced by Sir Christopher Wren who was a friend of Sir Stephen Fox. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Parishes adjacent to Pitton and Farley

 

Historical Descriptions

Pitton

The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

PITTON, a chapelry in Alderbury parish, Wilts; 4 miles E by N of Salisbury r. station. Post-town, Salisbury. Acres, 1, 150. Real property, with Farley, £2, 921. Rated property of P. alone, £1, 456. Pop., 396. Houses, 88. The property is all in one estate. The living is a p. curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Alderbury, in the diocese of Salisbury. The church is ancient. There are an alms-house-hospital for 12 persons, and a national school.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

English: Farley Hospital Sir Stephen Fox commi...
English: Farley Hospital Sir Stephen Fox commissioned Alexander Fort to design and build the almshouses. Fort himself had worked with Sir Christopher Wren. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Farley

Lewis Topographical Dictionary of England 1845

Farley, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and hundred of Alderbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 5 miles (E.) from Salisbury; containing 298 inhabitants. The chapel, rebuilt by Sir Stephen Fox, who was born here in 1627, is a neat edifice, highly embellished, containing some monuments and busts of the family of Fox, and of Lords Ilchester and Holland, the descendants of Sir Stephen; also a mural tablet to the memory of Charles James Fox, whose remains were interred in Westminster Abbey. Sir S. Fox, in 1678, founded an almshouse, and endowed it with £188 per annum, for the support of a chaplain, six men, and six women ; and the chaplain has, besides, the charge of a school established by the same benevolent individual.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis Fifth Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.

Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland Gorton 1833

Farley, co. Wilts.

P. T. Salisbury (81) 3 m. E. Pop. 229.

A tithing and chapelry in the parish and hundred of Alderbury; living, a curacy subordinate to the vicarage of Alderbury, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury, not in charge; patronage with Alderbury vicarage. The church here was built by Sir Stephen Fox, at the latter part of the seventeenth century, whose family was ancient, though Sir Stephen, born in 1627, was the first branch of it that distinguished itself in public life; by this benevolent patron the village obtained many benefits, among which is an almshouse for six old men, a like number of women, and a chaplain, endowed with 188l. per annum.

Sir Stephen Fox
Sir Stephen Fox (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The building is a plain structure of brick, consisting of a centre and two wings. In the former, which is appropriated to the chaplain, is a portrait of the founder. Here also is a charity-school, founded by the same beneficent individual, and conducted by the chaplain of the almshouse.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. II; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

Administration

  • County: Wiltshire
  • Civil Registration District: Alderbury
  • Probate Court: Court of the Peculiar of the Treasurer of Salisbury in the Prebendal of Calne
  • Diocese: Salisbury
  • Rural Deanery: Pre-1847 – None, Post-1846 – Amesbury
  • Poor Law Union: Alderbury
  • Hundred: Alderbury
  • Province: Canterbury
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