Bredwardine Cassey Directory of Herefordshire 1858

Bredwardine is a parish 12 miles from Hereford railway station, 7 north-east from Hay, 10 south-west from Weobley, and 149 from London, in Webtree Hundred, Hay Union, and Hereford archdeaconry and bishopric; it is situated on the right bank of the river Wye. The church is a small old stone building with small tower, has nave, chancel, and two bells. The living is a vicarage, worth £190 yearly, with residence. There is a small Charity school for boys and girls. The population, in 1851, was 422, and the acreage is 2,245. The soil is sandy and loamy; the subsoil is sand stone and clay. Sir Velters Cornwall is lord of the manor and chief landowner. The West Herefordshire Farmers Club is held at the Swann Inn, in November; and an annual coursing meeting takes place in January. There was formerly a castle, which was a strong and massive fortress. It gave birth and name to Thomas Bradwardin, archbishop of Canterbury, who for his various and abstruse learning, was called in that age the Profound Doctor.

Letters are received through Hereford. Hay is the nearest money order office.

Bennett H., farmer

Bennett James, farmer, Town house

Bubb Samuel, farmer, Wooller

Davies Aaron, tailor

Davies George, clock and watch maker

Davies James, farmer

Davies Thomas, farmer, Old house

Fowler Thomas, Red Lion and Commercial Inn, and farmer

Jenkins George, shoemaker

Jones Charles, farmer, New Weston

Newton Rev. Nathaniel

Parry Benjamin, farmer, Old court

Williams William, parish clerk

Source: Edward Cassey & Co.: History, Topography, and Directory of Herefordshire. Printed by William Bailey, 107, Fishergate 1858.

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