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Aberedw is a parish in the county of Radnorshire, South Wales.

Alternative names: Aberedow

Parish church: St Cewydd restored 1887.

The register of baptisms dates from the year 1690; burials, 1695;
marriages. 1700

Nonconformists: Independents, Congregational.

The land is chiefly pasture. The area is 4.807 acres of land and 54 of water; rateable value, £2,397; the population in 1911 was 211.

Churches

  • Aberedw Parish Church – Church of Wales. 120 sittings. Sexton (1920) Richard Morris.
  • Independents – Licensed 1830
  • Congregational – Opened Oct. 1871, 150 sittings

Parishes adjacent to Aberedw

  • Llanbedr Painscastle
  • Cregrina
  • Llanddewi’r Cwm
  • Llansantffraed-in-Elwell
  • Gwenddwr
  • Llandelio-Graban
  • Llanfaredd
  • Alltmawr
  • Llanbadarn-y-Garreg
  • Rhulen

Schools in Aberedw

Aberedw School 1926
Aberedw School 1926 (Photo credit: theirhistory)

Mixed National School

Public Elementary School (mixed), built in 1869 for 50 children.

Opened Jan. 17 1871 – 12 children present

Closed under s.13 of the Education Act 1944 when Radnorshire Education Committee (with the approval of the Ministry of Education), ceased to maintain Aberedw Voluntary Primary School.

According to the school logbooks, when the school was opened on 17 Jan. 1871 of the 12 children present only 7 of them could read. The 12 children were divided into two classes.

Mr. Stephens, the schoolmaster in 1871-1874 stated in the logbook that the playgrounds were too small and that most of the children go up to play in the churchyard.

By June 1871 attendance at the school had risen to 48.

Aberedw School
Aberedw School (Photo credit: theirhistory)

Masters / Mistresses.

Mr. Stephens 1871-1874 Nov. 13.

Mr. Alfred I. Stokes 22 Feb. 1875 –

Mrs E. A. Bates 1920

 

Historical Descriptions

The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

ABEREDW, a parish, with a r. station, in Builth district, Radnor; at the influx of the Edw to the Wye, and on the Mid Wales railway, 4 miles SE of Builth. Post town, Builth. Acres, 4,300. Real property, £2,022. Pop., 281. Houses, 56. The property is much sub-divided. Aberedw Court is the seat of the Mynors of Treago. Aberedw Castle, now reduced to mouldering walls, much hidden by foliage, on the summit of a mound, was the hunting-seat of Llewelyn-ap-Griffith, the last native prince of Wales. The adjacent scenery, up the glen of the Edw, is highly picturesque. Prince Llewelyn was slain in the vicinity; and an excavation in the rock, about 6 feet square, still bears the name of Llewelyn’s Cave. The living is a rectory, united with Llanvareth, in the diocese of St. David’s. Value, £355. Patron, the Bishop of St. David’s. The church is an old edifice, in good condition, on an eminence a short way above the castle. T. Jones, the painter, who died in 1803, was a native.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Aberedw 1830
Aberedw 1830

Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Aberedow, 3 miles S. Builth. P. 345
Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

A Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1845

Aberedw Or Aberedow (Aber-Edwy), a parish, in the union of Builth, hundred of Colwyn, county of Radnor, South Wales, 5 miles (S. E.) from Builth; containing 345 inhabitants. It derives its name from being situated at the mouth of the river Edwy, which, after flowing through the parish, empties itself into the Wye, the latter river here forming the line of boundary between the counties of Radnor and Brecknock: the Edwy is only a small stream, famous for its trout and eels. Within the short distance of a quarter of a mile from this place are various objects of great interest and attraction. The churchyard is bounded on one side by a steep precipice, at the base of which flows the Edwy, which from this point winds through a narrow defile of rocks, rising on one side to a height of nearly three hundred feet, and romantically varied by alternate stratifications of naked rock and green sward, partially concealed by hanging woods; on the other side the rocks, though their elevation. is less, have a more striking character.

Here a boldly projecting rock threatens with immediate destruction the traveller passing beneath it; there a perpendicular wall of solid rock, extending one hundred feet in height, presents its bold, unbroken front, richly mantled with mosses, ivy, and other parasitical plants, and in the clefts of which the larger birds build their nests. Among these rocks a rude cave, about six feet square, called Llewelyn’s Cave, is said to have been occasionally used as an asylum by that brave, but unfortunate, prince, Llewelyn ab Grufydd, the last royal defender of Welsh liberty and independence, against the overpowering army of Edward I.

English: The ruined walls A view along the rui...
The ruined walls A view along the ruined walls of Aberedw castle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A short distance north-westward from the church, and at the head of this beautiful and romantic dingle, Llewelyn had a castle, the ruins of which are yet standing on the banks of the Wye, and consist only of the fragment of a tower, or bastion, and part of a wall. During the defensive war which he waged against the English monarch, the Welsh prince summoned his adherents to a private conference at this castle ; but of the disastrous result of this movement a variety of accounts have been given, some of which cannot be reconciled with the localities of the district. Mr. Jones, the historian of Brecknockshire, who took great pains to reconcile the conflicting statements, says, that having marched to Aberedw, he was there surprised by a superior force of the enemy from Herefordshire, under the command of Edmund Mortimer and John Giffard, to whom intelligence of his arrival had been treacherously communicated by some of the inhabitants of this place. Thus unexpectedly attacked, Llewelyn fled with his men towards Builth, taking the precaution of ordering the shoes of his horse to be reversed, there being snow on the ground; which stratagem, however, was made known to the enemy by a blacksmith at Aberedw. Having arrived at the bridge over the Wye, he crossed it, and issued orders for its immediate demolition, before his pursuers arrived. Thus checked in their progress, the English returned to a ford, eight miles lower down on the river, which was known to some of the party, and thus effected a passage. Meanwhile, Llewelyn had proceeded to Builth, from which, failing in his attempts to procure aid from the garrison, he advanced westward, up the Vale of Irvon, on the south side, for about three miles, where he crossed the river, a little above Llanynis church, over a bridge called Pont y Coed, or “the bridge of the wood,” and stationed the few troops who had accompanied him in an advantageous position on the north side of that river, with a view to defend the bridge. The English, on coming up, made an attempt to obtain possession of it, but failing, they discovered a ford at a short distance, which a detachment of their troops secretly crossed, and coming behind the Welsh unawares, attacked them in the rear, and routed them: and Llewelyn himself was slain in a small dell, since called Cwm Llewelyn, or “Llewelyn’s dingle,” about two hundred yards from the scene of action, by one Adam de Francton, or de Frampton, who plunged his spear into his body without knowing the rank of his victim, and immediately joined his party in pursuit of the fleeing foe. Returning after the engagement, probably in search of plunder, de Francton discovered that he had slain the Welsh prince, whose head he immediately cut off, and sent to the king of England. The body was dragged a short distance, to a place where the road from Builth, two miles distant, branches off in two directions, one leading to Llanavan-Vawr, and the other to Llangammarch, where it was interred, the spot being still called Cevn y bedd, or Cevn bedd Llewelyn, “the ridge of Llewelyn’s grave.” From their infidelity on this occasion, the opprobrious designation of “Traitors of Aberedw,” is said to have been given by Llewelyn to the inhabitants of this place. About three hundred yards to the east of the castle of Aberedw, on the summit of an eminence, is a large tumulus, directly above the river Edwy, on the side of which is that most awful precipice before described, so beautifully mantled, and forming an object so truly picturesque from every point of view but this, where it cannot be observed without indescribable sensations of awe.

The parish is situated on a cross-road leading up to the new Radnor road to Builth, and is bounded on the east by the parishes of Rulen and Llanbadarn y Garreg, on the south by Llandilo Graban, on the west by the river Wye, and on the north by Llanvareth ; it comprises nearly 1000 acres, a considerable portion of which is good arable and pasture land well cultivated; and there are other portions thickly set with oak timber: the surface in some places is rocky and uneven, but the soil is in general favourable to the production of grain ; and good stone is quarried for building. The petty sessions for the hundred are occasionally held here. The living is a rectory with that of Llanvaredd annexed, rated in the king’s books at £12. 13. 4.; net income, £355 ; patron, Bishop of St. David’s. The church, dedicated to St. Cewydd, is a plain building, consisting of a nave and chancel, separated by an oak screen, in the later style of English architecture, with a square tower at the west end, which, if not rebuilt, appears to have undergone thorough repair in the time of the Tudors. There are two day schools, in which about thirty children are educated at the expense of their parents. Lewis Lloyd, in 1633, bequeathed a rent-charge, of which the portion appropriated to this parish amounts to £4. 6. 8. annually, and is received by the minister, who distributes £4 among such of the poor as receive the smallest parochial aid, and retains 6s. 8d. for preaching a sermon, according to the will of the donor. A bequest of £20 by Elizabeth Price, in 1742, for the benefit of the poor, has proved unproductive. Thomas Jones, a landscape painter of distinguished repute, and best known by his two pieces of the “Campi Phlegraei,” was born at Pen Carreg, in the vicinity of this place, where, having succeeded to the family estate, he resided upon it until his death, in 1803.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis Third Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.

A Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1842

Aberedw village
Aberedw village. The copyright on this image is owned by Angela Jones

Aberedw (Aber-Edwy), a parish, in the union of Brecknock, hundred of Colwyn, county of Radnor, South Wales, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Builth; containing 344 inhabitants. It derives its name from being situated at the mouth of the river Edwy, which, after flowing through the parish, empties itself into the Wye, the latter river here forming the line of boundary between the counties of Radnor and Brecknock: the Edwy is only a small stream, famous for its trout and eels. The surface of the parish is rocky and uneven, and the scenery pleasing and frequently picturesque: the view from the churchyard is extremely beautiful. The petty sessions for the hundred are occasionally held here. The living is a rectory, with that of Llanvarredd annexed, rated in the king’s books at £12.13.4.; present net income of the benefice, £355; patron, Bishop of St. David’s. The church, dedicated to St. Cewydd, is a plain building, consisting of a nave and chancel, separated by an oak screen, in the later style of English architecture, with a square tower at the west end, and, if not rebuilt, appears to have undergone thorough repair in the time of the Tudors. Here are two day schools, in which about 30 children are educated at the expense of their parents. A small plot of land was given by Lewis Lloyd, and, in 1746, the sum of £20 by Elizabeth Price, the proceeds of which are applied for the benefit of decayed housekeepers: the sum of £12 per annum is paid out of the rental of a farm called Vronoleu, in the parish of Llanbadarn y Garreg, the bequest of Mrs. Gwynne of that place, for distribution, in equal proportions, among decayed housekeepers of the parishes of Aberedw, Llanbadarn y Garreg, and Llanvarredd. The profits of this manor are under the superintendence of seven trustees, and are applied in apprenticing the poor children of several parishes.

Within the short distance of a quarter of a mile from this place are divers objects of great interest and attraction. The churchyard is bounded on one side by a steep precipice, at the base of which flows the Edwy, which from this point winds through a narrow defile of rocks, rising on one side to a height of nearly three hundred feet, and romantically varied by alternate stratifications of naked rock and green sward, partially concealed by hanging woods; on the other side, the rocks, though their elevation is less, have a more striking character. Here a boldly projecting rock threatens with immediate destruction the traveller passing beneath it; there a perpendicular wall of solid rock, extending one hundred feet in height, presents its bold and unbroken front, richly mantled with mosses, ivy, and other parasitical plants, and in the clefts of which the larger birds build their nests. Among these rocks a rude cave, about six feet square, called Llewelyn’s Cave, is said to have been occasionally used as an asylum by that brave, but unfortunate, prince Llewelyn ab Grufydd, the last royal defender of Welsh liberty and independence, against the overpowering army of Edward I. A short distance north-westward from the church, and at the head of this beautiful and romantic dingle, Llewelyn had a castle, the ruins of which are yet standing, on the banks of the Wye, and consist only of the fragment of a tower, or bastion, and part of a wall. During the defensive war which he waged against the English monarch, the Welsh prince summoned his adherents to a private conference at this castle; but of the disastrous result of this movement a variety of accounts has been given, some of which cannot be reconciled with the localities of this district. Mr. Jones, the historian of Brecknockshire, who took great pains to reconcile the conflicting statements, says that, having marched to Aberedw, he was there surprised by a superior force of the enemy from Herefordshire, under the command of Edmund Mortimer and John Giffard, to whom intelligence of his arrival had been treacherously communicated by some of the inhabitants of this place. Thus unexpectedly attacked, Llewelyn fled with his men towards Builth, taking the precaution of ordering the shoes of his horse to be reversed, there being snow on the ground; which stratagem, however, was made known to the enemy by a blacksmith at Aberedw. Having arrived at the bridge over the Wye, he crossed it, and issued orders for its immediate demolition, before his pursuers arrived. Thus checked in their progress, the English returned to a ford, eight miles lower down on the river, which was known to some of the party, and thus effected a passage. Meanwhile, Llewelyn had proceeded to Builth, from which, failing in his attempts to procure aid from the garrison, he advanced westward, up the Vale of Irvon, on the south side, for about three miles, where he crossed the river, a little above Llanynis church, over a bridge called Pont y Coed, or “the bridge of the wood,” and stationed the few troops who had accompanied him in an advantageous position on the north side of that river, with a view to defend the bridge. The English, on coming up, made an attempt to obtain possession of it, but failing, they discovered a ford at a short distance, which a detachment of their troops secretly crossed, and coming behind the Welsh unawares, attacked them in the rear, and routed them: and Llewelyn himself was slain in a small dell, since called Cwm Llewelyn, or “Llewelyn’s dingle,” about two hundred yards from the scene of action, by one Adam de Francton, or de Frampton, who plunged his spear into his body without knowing the rank of his victim, and immediately joined his party in pursuit of the fleeing foe. Returning after the engagement, probably in search of plunder, de Francton discovered that he had slain the Welsh prince, whose head he immediately cut off, and sent it to the king of England. The body was dragged a short distance, to a place where the road from Builth branches off in two directions, one leading to Llanavon-Vawr, and the other to Llangammarch, where it was interred, the spot being still called Cevn y bedd, or Cevn bedd Llewelyn, “the ridge of Llewelyn’s grave.” From their infidelity on this occasion, the opprobrious designation of “Traitors of Aberedw,” is said to have been given by Llewelyn to the inhabitants of this place. About three hundred yards to the east of the castle of Aberedw, on the summit of an eminence, is a large tumulus, directly above the river Edwy, on the side of which is that most awful precipice before described, so beautifully mantled, and forming an object so truly picturesque from every point of view but this, where it cannot be observed without indescribable sensations of awe. Thomas Jones, a landscape painter of distinguished repute, and best known by his two pieces of the “Campi Phlegraei,” was born at Pen Careg, in the vicinity of this place, where, having succeeded to the family estate, he resided upon it until his death, in 1803. The total expenditure of the parochial rates for the year ending March 25th, 1836, amounted to £268. 18., of which £194. 14. was for the relief of the poor, £60 towards county rates, and £14. 4. for incidental charges.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis Third Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 87, Hatton Garden. MDCCCXLII.

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

Aberedow, a parish in the hund. of Colwyn, Radnorshire, 14 miles south-west from New Radnor, and 4 miles south-east from Builth, in Breconshire, and included in the Builth union. Living, a rectory with that of Llanvareth, in the archd. of Brecon and dio. of St David’s; rated at £12 13s. 4d.; gross income, £417. Patron, the bishop of St David’s. It is situated upon the river Edw, at the union of which stream with the Wye, in this parish, are the remains of Llewelyn-ap-Griffith’s castle. Pop. in 1801, 333; in 1831, 344. Houses 65. A. P. £1,201. Poor rates, in 1837, £304. The neighbourhood abounds in beautiful and romantic scenery.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

England and Wales Delineated Thomas Dugdale 1835

Aberedwy. This delightful village derived its name from its situation, near the junction of the River Wye and Edwy. Nothing in nature can exceed the beauty of the neighbouring scenery. The Edwy descends through lofty walls of rock; in some places, broken into crags, which frightfully overhang the abyss. Near the place are the ruins of a castle, the retreat of the last native Welsh Prince, Llewelyn ap Gruffydd. The object of Llewelyn’s journey to Aberedwy was to consult the chief persons of the district, upon the best means of successfully opposing the King of England, then invading Wales. On his arrival he found himself disappointed. Instead of meeting with friends, he was surrounded by the enemy. Edmund Mortimer and John Gyfford, acquainted with his route, marched from Herefordshire, with their troops to meet him. The enemy were numerous – resistance was invain – Llewelyn withdrew to Builth. The mountains being covered with snow, he caused the shoes of his horse to be reversed, in order to baffle pursuit, but the treacherous smith betrayed him. Llewellyn broke down the bridge of Builth, but was closely followed by the English forces, who fruitlessly attempted to gain it. Sir Elias Walwyn crossed the river, with a detachment, about eight miles below, at a place called Little Tom’s Ferry Boat, and coming unexpectedly on the Welsh army, routed them. Llewelyn himself was attacked and slain, unarmed, in a narrow valley, not two hundred yards from the scene of the action. Adam Francton, the murder of Llewelyn, took no notice of his victim, but joined in the pursuit of the Welsh. Returning with the view of plundering the slain, he discovered the wounded person was no other than the Prince of Wales; for on stripping him, he found a letter in cipher and his privy seal. The brutal Francton, overjoyed that the Welsh prince had fallen into his hands, cut off his head, and sent it to the King of England, and thus perished the last native Prince of Wales.

Source: England and Wales Delineated by Thomas Dugdale assisted by William Burnett; published by Tallis & Co., Green Arbour Court, Old Bailey, 1835.

Population of Aberedw

  • 1801: 333
  • 1831: 344
  • 1861: 281; Houses, 56
  • 1911: 211

Post Office

Post & Telegraph Office.

Postmaster 1920: George Arthur Harley.

Railway Station

Railway: Cambrian

Station Masters: 1920 Price Jones

Parish Records

FamilySearch – Birth Marriage & Death records, Census and Military records – Free

Powys Archives

Baptisms, Marriages, Burials, Banns

  1. Marriages 1754-1783 
  2. Marriages 1813-1837 
  3. Marriages 1838-1970 
  4. Baptisms 1740-1812, burials 1740-1812, marriages 1740-1753
  5. Marriages 1785-1812, banns 1785-1953
  6. Baptisms 1813-1991 
  7. Burials 1813-1992 

Registers of services

Register of services 1887-1907 

Register of services 1932-1962 

Offertory books

Aberedw & Llanfaredd offertory books, 1888-1891, 1893-1903

Marriage licences and marriage related records

Marriage licences (39 items) 1810-1933 

A General Register Office circular to clergymen concerning the preparation of certified copies of marriage register entries. Also, 3 items relating to the registration of marriages 25 Jul 1837 

Certificate for marriage without licence (2 copies). 14 Jan 1869 

Notices of the publication of banns (7 items). No date

Certificates of registry of death

Certificates of registry of death c1839-1843, 1882-1885 (64 items). 1839-1885 

Glebe Lands

Papers concerning glebe land, including letters and plans 1893, 1898 and 1911; papers relating to proposed sale, 1909; Duties on land values returns for 1913, and provisional land valuation 1915; ‘Particulars of the Glebe Lands’ 1920

Provincial and diocesan papers including miscellaneous circulars, with correspondence relating to Glebe Lands, from the Representative Body of the Church in Wales. Leaflets concerning Church in Wales’s finances. (36 items) 1920-1933 

Tithe

Papers relating to tithes, including a tithe map (30/1), apportionment schedule, 1844 (30/2), Tithe Commission ‘Notice’, 1843 (30/3) and a redemption certificate, 1922 (30/4) 1843-1922 

Parsonage

A copy conveyance (including plan) of one acre of land as a site for a parsonage, including copy conveyance of the site, 1907; a letter relating to the application for a Q. A. B. grant, 1907; and a copy licence and grant as to the water supply for the above 1908

Churchwardens Accounts

Parish Church accounts, 1899-1903 (12/1-3), and statistical returns of parochial work, 1905-1916, 1922, 1938 (12/4-18)

Building Works on Church

  1. Papers concerning the fabric and furniture of the church, including plans for proposed alterations to the tower, 1887 and the builder’s contract for restoring the same 1888
  2. Financial statement of the restoration of the roof of the nave and of the erection of a vestry screen (3 copies), together with the builder’s contract, particulars of work, and plan and elevation of the vestry screen, 1895
  3. Balance sheet for re-flooring 1899; valuation of Aberedw and Llanfaredd churches 1913; a sketch of the chancel screen with a letter concerning it 1913
  4. Drawings and correspondence concerning new seating scheme 1913-1914
  5. Drawings and correspondence concerning silver communion vessels 1915; plan and elevation of the old font removed from Aberedw church to Allt-mawr church, July 1917
  6. Letters relating to a proposed new gate, 1909
  7. Letters concerning a memorial tablet, in memory of the rev. J. H. Lloyd, 1926

  8. Drawings, plans and other papers relating to the church lighting and heating system, 1954-1955

Dilapidations

Surveyor’s Ecclesiastical Dilapidations Amendment Act 13 July 1871 Report July 1903 for Aberedw and Llanfaredd. Receipts for work carried out (1903-1904) as a result of this report. Copy of Chapter 43 of the Act for the Amendment of the Law relating to Ecclesiastical Dilapidations.

Faculties

Faculty for a stained glass window 1925

Property Accounts

Miscellaneous bills, invoices and receipts (124 items) 1899-1924

Miscellaneous

Insurance polices Church, 1904; Rectory, 1908; School, 1911 and other receipts (15 items)

Vestry Book (with overseers of the poor accounts) 1822-1915

Twentieth-century electoral roll

Overseers’ of the Poor

Poor Rate

Overseers Receipt and Payment book 1837-1848 

Poor Rate Book 1849-1854 

Poor rate valuation list 1902 

Removal orders

  1. Request to remove Abraham Probert, Ann his wife, and his daughters from Aberedw to Rhulen. 27 Apr 1770 
  2. Request to remove John Hobby and Anne his wife from Llanbedr Painscastle to Aberedw. 8 Mar 1779 
  3. Request to remove Evan Prosser, Lucretia his wife and their daughter – Mary aged nine weeks – from Aberedw to Old Radnor. 18 Sep 1790 
  4. Request to remove John Taylor, Mary his wife, Jnothan aged eleven, Martha aged nine and William aged eight from Aberedw to Llanvaneth. 15 Oct 1790 
  5. Request to remove Margaret Jones, singlewoman, from Llanddewyrfarn, Brecon to Aberedw. 18 Oct 1793 
  6. Request to remove Mary Price, widow, and her children – Thomas aged eight, John aged five or six and Mary aged two and a half – from Aberedw to Lanvareth. 22 Feb 1794 
  7. Request to remove Eleanor, wife of Charles Davies, and their children – Margaret aged five and David aged two – from Aberedw to Llandufill, Montgomery. 16 Jan 1795 
  8. Request to remove Ann Thomas, spinster, from Aberedw to Cerigcadarn, Brecon. 17 Jun 1799 
  9. Request to remove Mary, widow of William Henley, and their son – Peter, aged six – from Aberedw to Llanddewyrcwm, Brecon. 26 Nov 1807 
  10. Request to remove Owen Owens, Elizabeth his wife and their children – John aged six and Owen aged three – from Aberedw to Llandewyynach. 24 Aug 1813 
  11. Request to remove Mary Meredith, singlewoman, now pregnant, from Aberedow (sic) to Cliro. 6 Nov 1816 
  12. Request to remove Ann Prothero, singlewoman, and now with child, from Llanigon to Abberedow. 18 May 
  13. Request to remove Richard Price and his children – Elizabeth aged five, Sarah aged three and John aged one – from Trevethin, Monmouth to Aberedow. 3 Oct 1832 
  14. Request to remove John Morgan from Aberystruth, Monmouth to Aberydw. 18 Oct 1832 
  15. Request to remove John Jones, Anne his wife and their children – John aged thirteen, Priscilla aged eleven, Caroline aged six and Thomas aged three – from Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan to Aberedw. 7 Nov 1832 

Settlement

  1. Richard and Anne Jones, and children from Bryngwyn to Aberedw 10 Mar 1721/1 
  2. John Morse, Elizabeth his wife and their 4 children, James, John, Anne and Elizabeth. Llandilo Graban and Aberedw.  13 Jan 1730/1 
  3. Silvanus Griffiths, his wife Margaret legally settled in parish of Llanvareth but inhabiting Aberedw. 4 Apr 1743 

  4. John Davies and Elizabeth his wife, and children William 11yrs., Elizabeth 9yrs., Thomas 6yrs., Jane 4yrs and John about 1 year acknowledged to be inhabitants of Llanvareth. 15 Jul 1746 

  5. William Prothero and Gwen his wife and Mary his/their daughter acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Disserth. 25 Apr 1751 

  6. David Davies labourer and Ann his wife acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Llandiloe in the county of Radnor 17 May 1751 
  7. John Morse the younger and Catherine his wife acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Llanvihangol Nantymolan. John Morse the elder being a witness. 15 Jul 1751 
  8. John Jones, Martha his wife and Martha his daughter acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Llanbadarn y Garreg 20? Apr 1753 
  9. James Matts and Elizabeth his wife acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Disserth in the county of Radnor. 29 Jul 1753
  10. Evan Williams and Mary his wife acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Llandiloe. 7 Nov 1753
  11. William Williams and Anne his wife and Sarah their daughter being three quarters old acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Llandiloe. 7 Nov 1753 
  12. James Watkins, Mary his wife and Elizabeth, William, Mary, James, Thomas and Evan his children acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Rulen. 28 Feb 1754 
  13. George Mazon/Inazon his wife and children acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Llanvareth. 7 Oct 1754 
  14. Evan Prytherch/Prothero, Elizabeth his wife and Evan their son aged about 18 months acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Trallong in the county of Brecon. 21 Oct 1754 
  15. David Jones and Mary his wife acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Kevenllys. 29 May 1755 
  16. William Haines and Mary his wife and his son William acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Llanthew in the county of Brecon. 29 May 1756 
  17. Lodwicks/Lodivicks Watkins and Elizabeth his wife, Elizabeth his daughter about 20yrs, Mary his daughter about 13yrs, Benjamin his son about 12yrs, Joan his daughter about 10yrs, Sarah his daughter about 5yrs. acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Landewy Cwm in the county of Brecon. 30 Oct 1759 
  18. Henry Williams taylor and Sarrah his wife, and Sarrah, John, Henry and Joseph their children acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Crickadarn, county of Brecon. 9 May 1765 
  19. William Williams labourer and Mary his wife, and Margaret his daughter acknowledged being inhabitants of the parish of Bringwyn. 22 Aug 1766 

Apprenticeships 

Three apprenticeship indentures; James Davies 1777, James Whitney 1784, and John James 1812 

Orders of Affiliation (Bastardy bonds)

  1. Esther Powell spinster of Painscastle has lately delivered of a male bastard child in the parish of Aberedw. Thomas Davies of the parish of Aberedw and Thomas Powell of the parish of Colva to pay maintenance.  27 Nov1751 
  2. Elizabeth Williams, single woman of the parish of Aberedw is now with child. Hugh Prosser, bachelor of Aberedw and James Prosser of the parish of Llandewy’rcwm, Brecon bachelor to pay maintenance. 8 May 1775 
  3. Lettice Rusbedg/Rusbatch, singlewoman begotten of a female bastard child called Mary…? by Daniel Evans son of Rees Evans. Maintenance to be paid by Rees Evans of the parish of Llangammarch, Brecon yeoman and John Williams of the parish of Llanavanvaur, Brecon yeoman. 14 Apr 1783 

  4. Margaret Jones, singlewoman of the parish of Aberedw lately delivered of a male bastard child, supposed father John Morgan of the parish of Llanvawr in Builth, yeoman. John Morgan and Thomas Morgan, yeoman of the parish of Llandewy Cwm, Brecon to pay maintenance. 2 Feb 1796 
  5. Sarah Powell singlewoman delivered of a female bastard child on the 25/9/1807 at Aberedw Village, parish of Aberedw. Reputed father John Jones of Aberedw servant. 15 Oct 1807 
  6. Jane Prosser on the 22/6/1808 was delivered of a female bastard child at Coed-yr-glwyn in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father Hugh Jones, farmer of Aberedw. 22 Apr 1809 
  7. Elinor Davies on the 3/2/1810 delivered of a female bastard child at Pantromole in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father William Jones of Newchurch. 16 Apr 1810 
  8. Ester Probert on the 18/8/1812 delivered of a male bastard child at Lloynon in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father to be Thomas Griffiths of Aberedw 17 Sep 1812 
  9. Sarah Powell on the 14/3/1814 delivered of male bastard child at Aberedw Village in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father is John Jones late of Aberedw, servant. 7 Apr 1814 
  10. Weney Powell single woman on the 11/11/1815 delivered of a male bastard child at Pencastle in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father William Prothero of Aberedw, servant. 25 Nov 1815 
  11. Sybil James on the 11/12/1816 delivered of a female bastard child at Coedy-Glyn in the parish of Aberedw. 31 Jan 1817 
  12. Mary Pugh single woman delivered of a male bastard child on the 27/12/1817 at Trevaughan in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father William Jones late of Aberedw. 17 Jan 1818 

  13. Elinor Davies single woman on the 20/3/1819 delivered of a male bastard child at Pentremole in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father William Williams of Aberedw, yeoman. 15 May 1819 

  14. Sarah Powell single woman on the 23/5/ 1819 delivered of a male bastard child at Hugh Powell’s house in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father to be Thomas Prosser of Aberedw, shoemaker. 18 Jun 1819 

  15. Elizabeth Powell single woman on the 15/8/1822 delivered of a male bastard child at Bailey in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father Samuel Vaughan late of the parish of Cliro Order served on the father 11 day of February 1823 or 1833? By William Williams churchwarden. 9 Feb 1823 

  16. Elinor Davies single woman on the 21/1/1823 delivered a female bastard child at Pentremole in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father Samuel Davies late of Llandilograban, labourer
    The order served on the same day by John Roberts overseer of the poor of Aberedw. 21 Feb 1823 
  17. Ann Havard singlewoman on the 3/2/1824 or 1833 delivered of a female bastard child at Newport in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father John Pugh of Aberedw, servant.
    Order was served on the reputed father on the 4.4.1833 by Edward Jones overseer of the poor. 3 April 1833? 
  18. Mary Davies singlewoman on the 9/2/1833 delivered of a male bastard child at Llannon in the parish of Aberedw. Reputed father Evan Havard late of Aberedw labourer Note – on the back it says this notice was not served. 22 Oct 1833 

Miscellaneous

A list of paupers Jun 1841 

A church door notice advertising a meeting to hear appeals against tax assessments (printed) 6 Oct1843 

School

School managers’ minute book 1903-1934 

Miscellaneous papers (47 items). These include Inspectors Reports, 1935-1942 (29/5-13); two letters dealing with the proposed closure in 1940 (29/15-6), and financial accounts, 1933-1942 (29/38-41) 1870-c1942 

Miscellaneous Records

Title Deeds

  1. Bargain and Sale of goods and chattels by Jenkin John, p. of Llangyfelach, to John Timothy of p. Llanguicke, yeoman  4 Jun 1763 
  2. Pre-nuptial marriage agreement between Samuel Dugan, of p. Llandrindod, yeoman, and Cathrin Jenkins, also of the p. Llandrindod, 13 February 1770 13 Feb 1770 
  3. Quit Claim by John Price of p. Bryngwyn, farmer, and Catherin his wife, the executrix of James Young, to John Prichard of p. Llansantffraid in Elwell, interest in the premises of Ty y Llandre and the messuage tenement and land called Ty y Camnant, all in p. Llansantffraid in Elwell 23 May 1795 
  4. Agreement by John Griffiths of p. Llansantfraid in Elwell, and Robert James,of p. Llanfair in Builth [Llanfair ym Muallt] a lease for nine years to David Jones, of p. Llanfaredd, the property and lands called Gar in the p. Llansantffraid [in Elwell] 16 Jan 1798 
  5. Agreement in that Job Davies, p. Aberedw, farmer will Quit Claim his estate to Lewis Price, p Aberedw, yeoman, in consideration for Mary Davies his daughter’s marriage portion 19 Nov 1801 
  6. Agreement that Thomas Jones, p. Landeilo Graban will lease for eleven years to Benjamin Beynon, p. Landeilo Graban, farmer, the messuage farm and land called Penbryn Coch in p. Llandeilo Graban 24 Mar 1802 
  7. Agreement that Charles Lawrence, p. Llanelwedd, Gent. will lease for eight years to David Thomas Dyer, late of Langamarch a Tucking Mill and two rooms in the house of Wern Wyn and a field called Dole Ddeintyr in p. Llanddewi’r Cwm 13 Dec 1802 
  8. Agreement that John Davies, p. Aberedw will lease for three years to Evan Griffiths, p. Llananno, a tenement and lands called Rhonllwyn in the p. Llandegley 21 Feb 1803 
  9. Bond between John Jones, Llandeilo Fawr, Co. Brecon, and Rev. Thomas Morgan, and Thomas Price both of the p. Builth, Co. Brecon in £200 in respect of the intended marriage of John Jones the son of the above bounded John Jones to Elizabeth daughter of Thomas Powell, p. Builth 17 Feb 1804 
  10. 1. Anna Hannah Avarina Williams, spinster 2. Thomas Morgan, Clerk Award made of £27. 6. 0 28 Oct 1805 

  11. Memorandum of an agreement between: 1 Ann Powell, Llandeilo Graban, widow, and 2 John Price, Llanfaredd, yeoman  27 Sep 1806 
  12. . 1. Rees Jones, Clyro and 2. Thomas Morgan, Llanwenarth 29 Mar 1810 

Printed and Miscellaneous Material

Miscellaneous papers including Woolmer’s Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 11 June 1842; a poster for Aberedw Garden Produce Show, 1900; a poster for Aberedw Sports & Quoits Match, 1910; and a statement of account for Aberedw Telegraph Office, 1913; a circular from the Swansea & Brecon Diocesan Guild of Bell-Ringers, 1923 and a copy of ‘Guild Rules’ (13 items) 1842-1923 

Copy replies to the questionnaires of the Royal Commission on the Church in Wales 1917 

Instrument fixing the table of fees (2 copies), and associated letter 1917 

 

Directories

Kelly’s Directory of South Wales 1920

Private Residents

Lloyd Rev. James Hughes M.A. (rector), Rectory

Rees William Thomas, Pontshony

Boderick Rev. Wm. (Congregational)

Windham Mrs. Tircelyn

Commercial

Morgan Richard, Seven Stars P.H. & blacksmith

Morris Hugh, miller (water), Court

Webb Susan (Mrs.), shopkeeper

Farmers

Davies George, Rhys-cog

Davies Morgan, Court

Evans Benjamin, Pen-garreg

Handley John, farm bailiff to W. T. Rees, esq., Pontshony

Jones James, Tre-vaughan

Jones Morgan, Dan-y-coed

Jones William, Hen-dre

Morris Edmund, Middle hall

Morris Thomas, Gwern-allt-cwm

Powell Evan, Cefn-binog

Price Danzey, Pentremoel & Llanon

Price Hugh, Court-y-Raber

Price John, White house

Probert John, Boatside

Sheen James, Pantau

Watkins Thomas, Pen-y-blaen

Notes

1872 – Floods – entry in school logbook as follows:

July 15 1872 ‘The recent floods causing the main bridge here to be swept away have prevented the children on the Llandilo side from attending. (Aberedw Mixed National School Logbooks)

Administration

  • County: Radnorshire
  • Hundred: Colwyn
  • Registration District: Builth
  • Registration Sub-district: Colwyn
  • Diocese: St. David’s
  • Rural Deanery: Elwel
  • Post Town: Builth
  • Poor Law Union: Builth
  • Petty Sessional Division: Colwyn
  • County Court District: Builth